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1. Coast Alaska's Ed Schoenfeld paid a visit to one of Prince of Wales Island's many caves to see moonmilk for himself

PRINCE OF WALES ISLAND, ALASKA (2008-12-20) Scientists are studying an unusual form of life found in some Southeast Alaska caves. It's called moonmilk, and it's made up of tiny organisms that chew through rock.  Researchers say it could provide a view of what life is like on other planets. And they're focusing on Southeast because the region has so much of it.

CoastAlaska's Ed Schoenfeld paid a visit to one of Prince of Wales Island's many caves to see moonmilk for himself, and learn more.

http://kcaw.org/modules/local_news/index.php?op=sideBlock&syndicated=true&ID=489

2. Alaska's El Capitan Cave

Alaska's El Capitan offers view into 420 million years of natural history.  Hopping into a hole in the ground isn't everyone's idea of a good time. But for some, it's an out-of-this-world — or under-this-world — experience. Only one natural cavern in Alaska is open to the public on a regular basis. It's El Capitan Cave in the remote north of Southeast's Prince of Wales Island.

http://aprn.org/2007/10/24/alaskas-el-capitan-offers-view-into-420-million-years-of-natural-history/

3. Underground waterways point to fisheries impacts

PRINCE OF WALES ISLAND, ALASKA (2008-08-05) Southeast scientists are depositing dye into holes in the ground to learn more about how water flows beneath the surface. The research is turning up unexpected information about the cave mazes underlying parts of Southeast Alaska. What they're learning could protect salmon and trout. And it could help manage logging and other development in the porous landscape known as "karst."

http://kcaw.org/modules/local_news/index.php?op=sideBlock&syndicated=true&ID=309

4. Southeast AK cave documentary

Southeast cave documentary featured on the Encounters radio program http://encountersnorth.org/audio_files/Encounters_Caves.mp3.

 
 

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