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Natural Science 


Phones

Phone:: 796-6200

Fax: 796-6447

Email

Address

Soboleff Bldg

11120 Glacier Hwy (SOB1)

Juneau, AK 99801

David Tallmon

Associate Professor of Biology & Department Chair - Natural Sciences

Phone: 796-6330 Fax: 796-6447

Email:

Anderson Bldg, 205D

Juneau Campus

  • Ph.D. 2001, University of Montana
  • M.S. 1995, University of Montana
  • B.A. 1992, University of California Santa Cruz

My general interests are in evolution, ecology, and conservation biology.  My focus is on understanding the evolutionary and ecological dynamics of natural populations using demographic and genetic models, molecular genetic data, and field data.  I have long-standing interest in combining population genomics and demographic information to infer important evolutionary and demographic parameters for wild populations.  More recently, my post-docs and I have focused upon the role of phenotypic plasticity in adaptation.

I have used models based on likelihood and approximate Bayesian computation to infer demographic vital rates or effective population size with the goal of providing useful results and tools for conservation and evolutionary biology.  As an example, some collaborators and I have recently developed an approach to infer effective size of a population using a single sample of microsatellite data and approximate Bayesian computation.  To use this application, visit http://genomics.jun.alaska.edu/

We focus on a number of different taxa in my lab, with current work on a handful of terrestrial and marine vertebrates and invertebrates, including: coastrange sculpins, giant Pacific octopus, red king crab, spruce grouse, file dogwinkles, ringed seals and boreal toads.  I enjoy working with students who are highly-motivated, broadly interested in evolution and conservation, and focused on understanding population-level process using descriptive and manipulative approaches.  Prospective grad students should read more here.

Publications

Curriculum vitae 

 

  • Society for the Study of Evolution
  • Ecological Society of America
  • Society for Conservation Biology
  • Wildlife Society of America
  • American Fisheries Society
  • B105 Fundamentals of Biology I
  • B106 Fundamentals of Biology II
  • B271 Ecology
  • B373 Conservation Biology
  • B375 Current Topics in Biology
  • B482 Evolution
  • B492 Biology Seminar
  • B498 Research in Biology
  • B396 Field Studies in Behavior and Ecology

Other Interests: telemark skiing, hiking, soccer and basketball

Pat Dryer

Research Professional

Phone: 796-6369

Email:

Arts and Sciences - Natural Sciences

Anderson Bldg, Rm. 352

Juneau Campus

Michelle Warrenchuk

Administrative Assistant

Phone: 796-6485 Fax: 796-6406

Email:

Trevor Fritz

Chemistry Lab Technician

Phone: 796-6199 Fax: 796-6447

Email:

Arts and Sciences - Natural Sciences

Anderson Bldg, Rm. 309

Juneau Campus

Christina M. Apathy

Administrative Assistant

Phone: 796-6200 Fax: 796-6447

Email:

Arts and Sciences - Natural Sciences

Anderson Bldg

Juneau Campus

Sarai Timothy

Outreach Coordinator

Phone: 796-6046

Email:

Arts and Sciences - Natural Sciences

Juneau Campus

http://www.uas.alaska.edu/arts_sciences/naturalsciences

Susan L. Kendig

Term Assistant Professor

Phone: 796-6275 Fax: 796-6447

Email:

Arts and Sciences - Natural Sciences - Chemestry

Anderson Bldg, Rm. 205F

Juneau Campus

http://www.uas.alaska.edu/arts_sciences/naturalsciences

Biology and Marine Biology  

Phones

Information: 796-6200

Fax: 796-6447

Email

Address

Anderson Bldg

11120 Glacier Hwy (AND1)

Juneau, AK 99801

Biology: Juneau Faculty

David Tallmon

Associate Professor of Biology & Department Chair - Natural Sciences

Phone: 796-6330 Fax: 796-6447

Email:

Anderson Bldg, 205D

Juneau Campus

  • Ph.D. 2001, University of Montana
  • M.S. 1995, University of Montana
  • B.A. 1992, University of California Santa Cruz

My general interests are in evolution, ecology, and conservation biology.  My focus is on understanding the evolutionary and ecological dynamics of natural populations using demographic and genetic models, molecular genetic data, and field data.  I have long-standing interest in combining population genomics and demographic information to infer important evolutionary and demographic parameters for wild populations.  More recently, my post-docs and I have focused upon the role of phenotypic plasticity in adaptation.

I have used models based on likelihood and approximate Bayesian computation to infer demographic vital rates or effective population size with the goal of providing useful results and tools for conservation and evolutionary biology.  As an example, some collaborators and I have recently developed an approach to infer effective size of a population using a single sample of microsatellite data and approximate Bayesian computation.  To use this application, visit http://genomics.jun.alaska.edu/

We focus on a number of different taxa in my lab, with current work on a handful of terrestrial and marine vertebrates and invertebrates, including: coastrange sculpins, giant Pacific octopus, red king crab, spruce grouse, file dogwinkles, ringed seals and boreal toads.  I enjoy working with students who are highly-motivated, broadly interested in evolution and conservation, and focused on understanding population-level process using descriptive and manipulative approaches.  Prospective grad students should read more here.

Publications

Curriculum vitae 

 

  • Society for the Study of Evolution
  • Ecological Society of America
  • Society for Conservation Biology
  • Wildlife Society of America
  • American Fisheries Society
  • B105 Fundamentals of Biology I
  • B106 Fundamentals of Biology II
  • B271 Ecology
  • B373 Conservation Biology
  • B375 Current Topics in Biology
  • B482 Evolution
  • B492 Biology Seminar
  • B498 Research in Biology
  • B396 Field Studies in Behavior and Ecology

Other Interests: telemark skiing, hiking, soccer and basketball

Sherry Tamone

Professor of Biology, Biology Program Coordinator

Phone: 796-6599 Fax: 796-6447

Email:

Arts and Sciences - Natural Sciences - Biology

Anderson Bldg, 205A

Juneau Campus

My studies are concerned with the role of hormones in regulating physiological processes in decapod Crustacea (crabs and lobsters). Hormones are chemical mediators that regulate physiological processes such as growth, reproduction, and osmoregulation. I am interested in the mechanism by which hormones such as ecdysteroids, methyl farnesoate, and molt-inhibiting hormone regulate growth and reproduction in decapod crustaceans. The majority of crustaceans that I study are commercially important crabs. These include Dungeness crab, Cancer magister, snow crab, Chionoecetes opilio, and king crab, Paralithodes camtschaticus.

Ecdysteroids are crustacean hormones that function to regulate the molt cycle and therefore the growth of these animals. Methyl farnesoate is a sesquiterpenoid hormone derived from the mandibular organ that functions in both reproduction and growth. Methyl farnesoate also may be critical during crustacean larval development and morphogenesis. Methyl farnesoate is structurally similar to the insect juvenile hormones, which regulate insect development.

Other studies related to crustacean physiology involve the effect of endogenous crustacean hormones on ectoparasites. Specifically, I have an interest in how hormones (ecdysteroids, methyl farnesoate) can be exploited by certain parasites. The model for these studies is the infection of the Dungeness crab, Cancer magister by the nemertean worm, Carcinonemertes errans.

Curriculum vitae

Publications

  • B105 & B106 Fundamentals of Biology
  • B305 Invertebrate Zoology
  • B310 Animal Physiology
  • B375 Current Topics in Biology
  • B415 Physiology of Marine Organisms
  • B498 Research in Crustacean Biology

Carolyn A Bergstrom

Assistant Professor of Marine Biology

Phone: 796-6582 Fax: 796-6447

Email:

Arts and Sciences - Natural Sciences - Biology

Anderson Bldg, 205B

Juneau Campus

  • B.S. 1995, University of Arizona (Tucson, Arizona)
  • Ph.D. 2002, University of Victoria (Victoria, British Columbia)
  • 2003-2007, Alberta Ingenuity Postdoctoral Fellow, Bamfield Marine Science Center
  • 2008-2009, International Polar Year Postdoctoral Fellow, University of Alaska Southeast

How does natural selection maintain phenotypic variation within marine species?  What role do ecological interactions like predation and competition play?  My research interests are broadly concerned with these questions.  More specifically, I investigate (1) how ecological interactions in the ocean orchestrate relationships between form, function, and fitness, (2) the ecofunctional implications of bilateral asymmetries, and (3) the interaction between phenotypic plasticity and heritable variation.   I explore these topics with a variety of techniques, including morphometrics and behavioral observations, field experiments, multivariate statistics, stable isotope analyses, and experimental assessment of fitness.

I currently have two main research projects underway. The first of these is the evolution of body asymmetry in flatfish. Flatfish exhibit remarkably derived body morphology.  They undergo metamorphosis as pelagic larvae, where one eye migrates over the dorsal midline so that both eyes are on the same side of the head.  The fish then lie on the ocean floor, eyed-side facing up.  While the vast majority of the 715 flatfish species contain all left-eyed or all right-eyed individuals, 7 species contain both morphs. To date, we don't have a good understanding of the evolutionary trajectory flatfish took to become asymmetric, or the significance of asymmetry direction.  One polymorphic species, the starry flounder, exhibits a cline in the north Pacific in the relative frequency of left- vs. right-eyed individuals, and the two morphs show evidence of ecological segregation. It is one of the first demonstrations of the ecological significance of polymorphism in a marine species, and contributes to our understanding how asymmetry evolved across the flatfish order. 

My second current research project involves how selective predation maintains variation in body color and color plasticity of sculpins.  Sculpins exhibit tremendous variation in their body coloration and their ability to change color both among and within populations.  Collaborators (David Tallmon, Andrew Whiteley, Tyler Linderoth) and I are currently investigating the role selective predation plays in molding the expression of color and color plasticity in these fish. This could have important implications to our understanding of color variation and ecological selection in other cryptic marine fish species such as juvenile flatfishes and gunnels.

Select publications
Curriculum vitae

  • BIOL 215 Introduction to Marine Biology
  • BIOL 375 Current Topics in Biology
  • BIOL 427 Introduction to Ichthyology
  • BIOL 481 Marine Ecology

Michael Stekoll

Professor of Chemistry and Biochemistry

Phone: 796-6279 Fax: 796-6447

Email:

Arts and Sciences - Natural Sciences - Biology

Anderson Bldg, 205E

Juneau Campus

  • B.S., 1971, Stanford University
  • Ph.D., 1976, University of California Los Angeles

The biological communities along most of the rocky shores of Alaska are defined by the marine plant associations. A major portion of the primary production throughout the year is provided by the benthic plants in the nearshore. These communities are often disturbed not only by natural phenomena, such as winter storms and ice, but also by anthropogenic disturbances such as harvesting and pollution.

My research has concentrated in both basic and applied aspects of the biology and ecology of marine benthic plants and on the effects of disturbances on this community. My associates and I have investigated the effects of harvest and pollution on the intertidal and subtidal seaweeds.  We have also developed techniques fore using remote sensing to map floating kelp beds in SE Alaska.

We have conducted applied research on the commercial exploitation of seaweeds. In addition to performing seaweed resource assessments for potential commercial harvest, we have investigated the potential of mariculture as a means to enhance exploited algal resources. There are many organisms that can be cultured which have potential to be developed as a high value product. Among these are seaweeds such as Macrocystis (giant kelp), Nereocystis (bull kelp) and Porphyra (nori).  My lab has worked out the procedures for the successful mariculture of Macrocystis.  We have researched the physiological ecology of Porphyra as it relates to its culture. This plant can be marketed both as nori for the sushi and health food market and as black seaweed for the Native community.  Our latest project is investigating nitrogen partitioning in the red alga Palmaria, a potential feed for abalone culture, throughout its growing season. I am also involved in kelp ecology and mariculture studies in South Africa in cooperation with colleagues at the University of Cape Town and Marine and Coastal Management.

Other "non seaweed" projects have involved the effects of pollution on salmon and herring. We completed research on the potential impacts of mining activities on the nearshore benthos, and have investigated the effects of common ions (hard water) from mine wastewater on the growth and development of coho salmon. Another project has been research on delayed effects of oil exposure on zebra fish as a model for salmonid exposure. 

Select Publications

Curriculum vitae

  • BIOL 401 Phycology
  • BIOL 482 Aquatic Pollution
  • CHEM 105 General Chemistry
  • CHEM 341 Organic Chemistry
  • CHEM 342 Biological Chemistry

Heidi Pearson

Assistant Professor of Marine Biology

Phone: 796-6271 Fax: 796-6447

Email:

Arts and Sciences - Natural Sciences - Biology

Anderson Bldg, Rm 205C

Juneau Campus

http://www.uas.alaska.edu/arts_sciences/naturalsciences/biology

Ph.D., Texas A&M University, College Station, TX, 2008
B.S., Duke University, Durham, NC, 1998

Curriculum vitae (.pdf)

 


Go here to learn about my marine mammal research lab, BREACH, and read the latest updates from the field.


Biology of Marine Mammals (lecture and lab)
Cetacean Behavior and Behavioral Ecology (lab)
Conservation and Biology of Marine Birds and Sea Turtles (lecture)
Ecosystem Ecology and the Global Environment (lecture)
Human Anatomy and Physiology (lecture and lab)
Introduction to Biology (lecture and lab)
Marine Birds and Mammals (lecture and lab)
Marine Mammals and Ecosystem Change (seminar)
Marine Mammal Field Research Methods (lecture and lab)
Prospects for Planet Earth (lecture)

Johanna Fagen

Assistant Professor of Biology

Phone: 796-6395 Second Phone: 523-4977 Fax: 6447

Email:

Arts and Sciences - Natural Sciences - Biology

Anderson Bldg, 205G and Bill Ray Center 202

Juneau Campus

A.A.S. State University of New York at Farmingdale
B.S. Cornell University
M.A. West Chester University

S111 Human Anatomy and Physiology I
S112 Human Anatomy and Physiology II
B441 Animal Behavior
B300 Vertebrate Zoology
B103 Biology and Society

Keith Marlin Cox

Term Assistant Professor of Biology

Phone: 796-6586 Fax: 796-6447

Email:

Arts and Sciences - Natural Sciences - Biology

Anderson Bldg, 2056

Juneau Campus

http://www.uas.alaska.edu/artssciences/naturalsciences

Biology: Sitka Faculty

Deborah Barnett

Adjunct

Phone: 747-7700

Email:

Sitka Campus

University of Wisconsin-Madison:
B.S.   Biochemistry May 1990 
M.S.   Endocrinology and Reproductive Physiology Dec. 1992  
Ph.D. Cell and Molecular Biology: Developmental Biology Dec. 1995  

Research interests include prenatal programming metabolic and reproductive disorders, programming of the stress axis, neuroendocrine regulation of reproductive behavior and fertility, and the physiology/epidemiology of gestational weight gain in humans. I am interested in the physiological consequences that environmental disruption during important developmental stages can have on adult health.  In particular, I am interested in how the hypothalamus is programmed during its development.

Abbott DH, Bruns CR, Barnett DK, Dunaif A, Dumesic DA, Tarantal AF (2010) Experimentally-induced gestational androgen excess disrupts glucoregulation and stimulates growth in fetal and neonatal female rhesus monkeys J Clin Endocrinol Metab 95:2038-2049

Dumesic DA, Patankar MS, Barnett DK, Lesnick TG, Hutcherson BA, Abbott DH. (2009) Early prenatal androgenization results in diminished ovarian reserve in adult female rhesus monkeys. Hum Reprod 2009.

Abbott DH, Barnett DK, Levine JE, Padmanabhan V, Dumesic DA, Jacoris S, Tarantal AF. (2008)  Endocrine antecedents of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) in fetal and infant prenatally androgenized female rhesus monkeys.  Biol Reprod Jul; 79(1):154-63.

Barnett DK, Bunnell, TM, Millar RP and Abbott DH. (2006) Gonadotropin-releasing hormone II stimulates female sexual behavior in marmoset monkeys. Endocrinol 147(1):615-23.

Abbott DH, Bruns CM, Barnett DK, Dumesic DA (2006) Fetal programming of polycystic ovary syndrome. In: Polycystic Ovary Syndrome, 2nd Edition. W.G. Kovacs and R.L. Norman (eds). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press; 262-287.

Abbott DH, Barnett DK, Bruns CM, Dumesic DA. (2005) Androgen excess fetal programming of female reproduction: a developmental aetiology for polycystic ovary syndrome? Hum Reprod Update 11(4):357-74. Review.

Abbott DH, Fong SC, Barnett DK, Dumesic DA (2004) Nonhuman primates contribute unique understanding to anovulatory infertility in women. ILAR 45(2):116-131.

Barnett DK, and Abbott DH. (2003) Reproductive adaptations to a large-brained fetus open a vulnerability to anovulation similar to polycystic ovary syndrome.  Am J Hum Bio 15:296-319.

Abbott DH, Barnett DK, Colman RJ and Schultz-Darken NJ. (2003) Aspects of basic biology and life history of common marmosets important for biomedical research.  J Comp Med 53:339-350.

Barnett DK, Kimura J, Clayton MK and Bavister BD. (1997) Glucose and phosphate toxicity in hamster preimplantation embryos involves disruption of cellular organization, including distribution of active mitochondria.  Molec Reprod Dev 48:1-11.

Barnett DK and Bavister BD. (1996) Inhibitory effect of glucose and phosphate on the second cleavage division of hamster embryos: is it linked to metabolism? Human Reprod 11:177-183.

Barnett DK, Kimura J, Bavister BD. (1996) Translocation of active mitochondria during hamster preimplantation embryo development studied by confocal laser scanning microscopy. Dev Dynamics 205, 64-72.

Barnett DK and Bavister BD. (1996) What is the relationship between metabolism of preimplantation embryos and their developmental competence in vitro.  Molec Reprod Dev 43, 105-143.

Barnett DK and Bavister BD. (1992) Hypotaurine requirement for in vitro development of golden hamster one-cell embryos into morulae and blastocysts, and production of term offspring from in vitro fertilized ova. Biol Reprod 47, 297-304.

Curriculum Vitae

B111: Anatomy and Physiology I
B112: Anatomy and Physiology II
B240: Introduction to Microbiology

Marnie Chapman

Professor, Biology

Phone: 747-7702

Email:

Arts and Sciences - Natural Sciences - Biology

Sitka Campus

M.S. Biology University of St. Joseph (Focus: Human Biology) 2008
M.A. Biology Humboldt State University (Focus: Intertidal Biology) 1992
B.A. Zoology Humboldt State University 1983
Graduate coursework at Friday Harbor Laboratory and Bamfield Marine Station

Special Recognition:

UA President’s Award for Outstanding Distance Educator in Alaska (2001)
UAS Faculty Excellence Award Sitka Campus (2012)

BIOL 111 Human Anatomy & Physiology I
BIOL 112 Human Anatomy & Physiology II

Past Courses Taught:

Microbiology, Natural History of Alaska, Intertidal Biology, General Biology, Biology & Society,
General Zoology, Alaska Naturalist Program; Science for K-8 Teachers

I’m originally from Northern California and lived in Bethel and Skagway before moving to Sitka in 1992. I enjoy helping students build a firm foundation in the topic that will serve them well in their careers. I am active in the Human Anatomy and Physiology Society (HAPS).  As part of HAPS I helped develop standards for undergraduate human anatomy and physiology courses taught in the US and Canada. I am committed to quality eLearning opportunities and developed and delivered the first distance science courses offered by UAS. As Sitka’s lab director I currently help oversee the lab support portion of UAS Sitka Distance Science courses which have grown to involve multiple faculty members and currently serve over 200 students each semester.  I believe it is important to give back to my community by doing what I can to enrich science literacy, assist in community-based scientific research, and help create science-related opportunities for everyone, especially K-12 students.

Community Projects:

  • Served as an invited researcher for Scientist in the Schools programs at elementary, middle, and high school levels.
  • Helped establish science clubs at the local elementary and middle school that give kids a chance to interact with scientists and collect data for meaningful research projects.
  • Found opportunities for K-12 students to meet and work with scientists from the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center, UCSF, UAF and Project Budburst.
  • Assisted with marine invertebrate identification for community BioBlitzes and provided intertidal ecology expertise for many community organizations.
  • Involved in a project to revisit historical work done in Sitka by Ed (Doc) Ricketts and link it to modern intertidal survey protocols.

I am particularly interested in the ecology and functional anatomy of intertidal organisms, especially with respect to predator-prey relationships.  I am also very involved in marine invasive issues and research, particularly with respect to invasive tunicates. I am a member of the Alaska Marine Invasive Species subcommittee and the Didemnum vexillum Rapid Response Team.

Jan Straley

Associate Professor, Marine Biology

Phone: 747-7779

Email:

Arts and Sciences - Natural Sciences - Biology

Sitka Campus

Kitty LaBounty

Assistant Professor, Biology

Phone: 747-9432

Email:

Arts and Sciences - Natural Sciences - Biology

Sitka Campus

Paul Bahna

Assistant Professor, Biology

Phone: 747-7749

Email:

Arts and Sciences - Natural Sciences - Biology

Sitka Campus

Jon Martin

Associate Professor, Biology

Phone: 747-7752

Email:

Arts and Sciences - Natural Sciences - Biology

Sitka Campus

Biology: Ketchikan Faculty

Christopher Donar

Assistant Professor of Science

Phone: 228-4557

Email:

Arts and Sciences Department

Paul Bldg, Room 510

Ketchikan Campus

University of Michigan-Ann Arbor (1994 - 1999)  

Ph. D., Natural Resources and Environment

Dissertation: Holocene Paleolimnology of Lakes in the Central Highlands Region of Florida.


Eastern Michigan University-Ypsilanti (1990 - 1992)

M. S., Biology

Thesis: Paleolimnology of the Ford Lake Reservoir.    

 

Eastern Michigan University-Ypsilanti (1982 - 1988)

B. S., Biology

My research interests are in the ecology, taxonomy and systematics of diatoms (Bacillariophyta) and other freshwater algae. I am particularly interested in paleolimnology and the use of diatoms to infer short-term historical changes in aquatic ecosystems due to human modification and long-term changes in response to climatic factors. I feel that among algal groups, diatoms can provide numerous research opportunities in ecological studies, paleoecology, cell physiology, and systematic biology. I have conducted field research on the growth characteristics of periphyton mats in the Florida Everglades. Presently, I am investigating the taxonomy of algal assemblages in lakes and aquatic ecosystems of Isle Royale National Park. 


Born in Des Moines Iowa, raised in Southeast Michigan. I am a practicing member of the Hakuryu Karate Do and have attained the rank of Nidan, 2nd degree black belt. 

Biology: Staff

Sara Caldwell

Biology Lab Technician

Phone: 796-6316 Second Phone: 723-8081

Email:

Arts and Sciences - Natural Sciences - Biology

Anderson Bldg, Rm 310

Juneau Campus

Environmental Sciences  

Phones

Information: 796-6523

Fax: 796-6406

Email

Address

Hendrickson Bldg

11120 Glacier Hwy (SOB1)

Juneau, AK 99801

Cathy L. Connor

Professor of Geology, Environmental Science Program Coordinator

Phone: 796-6293 Fax: 796-6406

Email:

Arts and Sciences - Natural Sciences - Environmental Sciences

Soboleff Annex, Rm. 106

Juneau Campus

http://www.uas.alaska.edu/pub/CLCONNOR

Ph.D. Geology 1984, University of Montana, Missoula, MT
Doctoral Dissertation: Late Quaternary Glaciolacustrine and Vegetational History of the Copper River Basin, Southcentral Alaska.

M.S. Geology 1975, Stanford University, Stanford, CA
Masters thesis: Holocene Sedimentation History of Richardson Bay California.

B.S. Geology 1974, Stanford University, Stanford, CA

Curriculum vitae (PDF | 149Kb)

Quaternary Geology and Paleoecology, Regional Alaskan Geology, Glaciology, Neotectonic Processes, Geoscience Education

  • Outreach in Geoscience Education in Alaska′s secondary schools
  • Alaska Geology–Understanding how it all came together and how it is changing
  • Comparison of Neoglacial stratigraphy with Tlingit Oral History Glacier Bay
  • Geomorphic Evolution of Mendenhall Valley during repeated glaciations
  • Uplift in Northern Southeastern Alaska
  • The Little Ice Age retreat of Mendenhall Glacier and Comparison with early 21st Century Rapid Retreat
  • Sediment flux through the Mendenhall Glacier/River system
  • Bathymetric surveys Mendenhall Lake 2000–2003
  • Recent Paleoecology SE AK fjord basins–Gravity Core studies marine sediments
  • Calving Retreat LeConte Glacier 1996–2000
Selected Publications

Lower Division:

  • GEOL 104 – Introductory Physical Geology & Lab
  • GEOL 105 – Historical Geology
  • Environmental Geology
  • ENVS 101 – Introduction to Environmental Science & Lab
  • GEOL 271 – Earth Materials (Mineralogy & Petrology) with Lab
  • ENVS 111 – Introduction to GPS
  • ENVS 110 – Introduction to ArcGIS
  • Introduction to Geologic Field Methods (for undergraduates, for AK secondary science teachers)
  • Introduction to Field Archeology

Upper Division:

  • GEOL 301 – Geomorphology
  • GEOL 300 – Geology of Alaska (Emphasis on Structure & Tectonics)
  • GEOL 310 – Glaciation and Climate Change
  • GEOL 315 – Field Course Glacier Surveying
  • ENVS 491 – Environmental Science Internship
  • ENVS 492 – Environmental Science Seminar (Capstone Course)
  • Independent Studies
  • Geology and Geomorphology of the Tatshenshini and Lower Alsek Rivers
  • Juneau Icefield Research Program Courses

Lisa Hoferkamp

Associate Professor of Chemistry

Phone: 796-6538 Fax: 796-6447

Email:

Arts and Sciences - Natural Sciences - Environmental Sciences

Anderson Bldg, Rm. 313

Juneau Campus

National Research Council Postdoctoral Fellow, National Exposure Research Laboratory - USEPA, Athens, GA
Kinetic studies of the anaerobic attenuation of munitions compounds

  • Ph.D., Inorganic Chemistry, University of Neuchâtel, Neuchâtel, Switzerland Synthesis and X-ray structural characterization of catalytically active transition metal clusters
  • M.S., Inorganic Chemistry, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL Development of polymer modified electrode surfaces derived from Ni(II) and Cu(II) complexes
  • B.S., Chemistry, University of Idaho, Moscow, ID

Study of the natural environment from a chemical viewpoint offers fascinating research topics ranging from basic research on poorly understood natural processes to applied research investigating the effects of human activities on various ecosystems and remediation efforts. The pristine system of forests and waterways proximate to the University of Alaska Southeast are ideal natural laboratories for these types of studies.

My research centers on the transport, deposition and attenuation of heavy metal and organic pollutants in high latitude environments. Heavy metal studies in my lab include characterization of the iron, lead and copper species associated with high organic carbon soils under anaerobic conditions.  An increasing presence of ocean-going vessels at Alaskan ports has also raised concern about environmental levels of tin.  The chemical interactions of tin with environmental matrices (e.g. microbial communities) profoundly influence its mobility and toxicity.   These metals have become common features of the southeastern Alaska topography and identifying the specific form of these metals under various environmental conditions provides valuable insight into their transport properties. Organic pollutants, on the other hand, are typically associated with industrialized areas and as such have limited local sources at higher latitudes. Atmospheric transport and to some extent urbanization however, have provided for detectable levels of numerous synthetic organic chemicals in the arctic hydrosphere, lithosphere and biosphere. Studies aimed at quantifying levels of organic pollutants and their attenuation products in high latitude regions are also pursued in my laboratory. Of particular interest to me are halogenated organic contaminants and their redox chemistry in the environment.  Once these pollutants reach higher latitudes, I study their transformations as they interact with the abiotic and biotic environment of southeastern Alaska and how the contaminant’s environmental impact is controlled by those interactions.  Both heavy metal and organic pollutant studies involve the use of state of the art analytical instrumentation including atomic absorption spectrometry and mass spectrometry. Collaborations with the University of Alaska Anchorage, the University of Alaska Fairbanks and University of Alaska Southeast biologists continue to support and strengthen my contaminant studies. In addition to contaminant studies, I conduct ongoing research into the habitat remediation and restoration potential of created wetlands. Collaborative efforts with the National Marine Fisheries Service and the U.S. Department of Fish and Wildlife have led to the development and continued study of two created wetlands in the Mendenhall valley. Results from this project have shown these landscape features serve as moderators of groundwater intrusion and stormwater runoff, provide for carbon sequestration and contaminant retention and allow for significantly improved habitat. All of my research projects at the University of Alaska Southeast have benefited from the contributions of my undergraduate research assistants.

Selected Publications

The chemistry courses that I teach at the University of Alaska Southeast include general, organic and environmental chemistry.
The laboratory portion of Environmental Chemistry focuses on analytical methods used in environmental analyses.

The UAS Natural Science department is well equipped for gas and liquid chromatography, mass spectrometry, atomic absorption spectrometry and ultraviolet, visible and infrared spectroscopy. I have taught Special Topics courses on contaminant attenuation in the natural environment and wetland chemistry. All of these courses provide valuable insight into natural processes and provide a foundation for understanding natural systems and the impacts of contemporary societies on those systems.

Lower Division:

  • CHEM 103 - Introduction to Chemistry I
  • CHEM 105 - General Chemistry I
  • CHEM 106 - General Chemistry II
  • CHEM 193 - ST: Chemistry Recitation
  • CHEM 297 - IS: Chem Lab
  • CHEM 397 - IS: Chemical Research

Upper Division:

  • CHEM 341 - Organic and Biological Chemistry I
  • CHEM 450 - Environmental Chemistry
  • CHEM 497 - IS: Environmental Chemistry
  • ENVS 491 - Environmental Science Internship
  • ENVS 492 - Seminar: Contaminant Attenuation in Natural Systems
  • ENVS 498 - Research in Environmental Science
  • ENVS 498 - Research: Mobility of Metals

Eran Hood

Professor of Environmental Science

Phone: 796-6244 Fax: 796-6406

Email:

Arts and Sciences - Natural Sciences - Environmental Sciences

Soboleff Annex, Rm. 102

Juneau Campus

Ph.D. Geography 2002, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO
M.A. Geography 1998, University of Colorado, Boulder,CO
A.B.  Biology 1991, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA

Curriculum vitae

  • Watershed-scale biogeochemistry
  • Nutrient cycling in aquatic systems
  • Alpine hydrology
  • Snow hydrology and snow chemistry
Selected Publications

Lower Division:

  • ENVS 101 – Introduction to Environmental Science & Lab
  • ENVS 111 – Introduction to Differential GPS

Upper Division:

  • GEOL 302 – Hydrology
  • ENVS 397 – IS: Nature of Soils
  • ENVS 404 – Snow Hydrology
  • ENVS 408 – Biogeochemistry
  • ENVS 491 – Environmental Science Internship
  • ENVS 492 – Undergraduate Research Seminar
  • ENVS 493 – Glacier Surveying
  • ENVS 493 – Snow and Glaciers
  • ENVS 494 – Practicum: Snow Hydrology
  • ENVS 497 – IS: Field/Snow Hydrology
  • ENVS 497 – IS: Rsrch.: Snow Infl. on Forage

Sonia Nagorski

Research Assistant Professor

Phone: 796-6580 Fax: 796-6406

Email:

Arts and Sciences - Natural Sciences - Environmental Sciences

Juneau Campus

Ph.D. Geology, 2001, University of Montana, Missoula, MT

M.S. Geology, 1997, University of Montana, Missoula, MT

B.A. Geology and History, 1994, Amherst College, Amherst, MA

Curriculum vitae (PDF)

Environmental aqueous geochemistry, including:

  • Trace metal dynamics in hydrological systems
  • Mercury biogeochemistry
  • Trace metal records in ancient ice cores
  • Seasonal, event, and diel scale variations in stream water quality
  • Mining pollution
  • Streambed sediment geochemistry
  • Surface water- ground water interactions
  • Ground water hydrology, flow modeling, and chemistry
Selected Publications

Lower Division:

  • GEOL 105 – Geological History of Life
  • CHEM 103 – Introduction to Chemistry (Laboratory)
  • GEOL 104 - Physical Geology
  • MATH 055 - Introduction to Algebra

Sanjay Pyare

Associate Professor of GIS and Landscape Ecology, Geography BS Program Coordinator

Phone: 796-6007 Fax: 796-6406

Email:

Arts and Sciences - Natural Sciences - Environmental Sciences

Juneau Campus

Ph.D. Ecology, Evolution, and Conservation Biology 1999, University of Nevada, Reno, NV
Doctoral Dissertation: Interrelationships among northern flying squirrels, ectomycorrhizal fungi, and conifers in old-growth forest habitat of the Sierra Nevada

B.A. Biology (Studio Art Minor), Hartwick College, Oneonta, NY
Senior Thesis: Habitat Use by Eastern Chipmunks

Curriculum vitae (PDF|85Kb)

  • GIS-supported landscape assessments
  • Ground-truthing GIS and remotely sensed resources
  • Landscape connectivity, habitat modeling, animal dispersal/movement
  • Aquatic-terrestrial-marine interactions
  • Hands-on/experiential education
  • Supporting information needs of resource managers
Selected Publications

Lower Division:

  • ENVS 110 – Intro to ArcGIS
  • ENVS 111 – Intro to Differential GPS
  • ENVS 293 – ST: Mobile GIS Technology Applications
  • ENVS 2xx – Biogeography of Southeast Alaska

Upper Division:

  • ENVS 310 –Intro to GIS
  • ENVS 393 – Advanced GIS
  • ENVS 4xx –Landscape Ecology
  • ENVS 403 –Remote Sensing
  • ENVS 493 –ST:Special Projects in GIS and Remote Sensing

Lori Sowa

Assistant Professor of Engineering

Phone: 796-6274

Email:

Arts and Sciences - Natural Sciences - Environmental Sciences, Arts and Sciences - Natural Sciences - Preengineering,

Juneau Campus

M.S. Environmental Science and Engineering, 1999, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO

B.S. Civil and Environmental Engineering, 1998, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV

 

Curriculum vitae (PDF)

Lower Division:

  • ENGR 151 – Engineering Practices I
  • ENGR 161 – Engineering Practices II (MATLAB programming)
  • CHEM 105 - General Chemistry I (lab only)
  • CHEM 106 - General Chemistry II (lab only)

 

Jason M. Amundson

Assistant Professor of Geophysics

Phone: 796-6247

Email:

Arts and Sciences - Natural Sciences - Environmental Sciences

Soboleff Annex, Rm 109

Juneau Campus

Ph.D. Geophysics, 2010, University of Alaska Fairbanks
Iceberg Calving Dynamics of Jakobshavn Isbrae, Greenland

M.S. Geophysics, 2006, University of Alaska Fairbanks
Evidence for Stress Redistribution Beneath Black Rapids Glacier, Alaska

B.S. Geology, 2003, University of Minnesota
B.S. Geological Engineering, 2003, University of Minnesota

Curriculum Vitae (see Jason's personal site)

  • Controls on iceberg calving
  • Oceanic response to calving events
  • Glacier seismicity
  • Subglacial processes, including basal motion and glacial erosion

Lower Division:

  • PHYS 103: College Physics I
  • PHYS 104: College Physics II
  • PHYS 211: General Physics I
  • PHYS 212: General Physics II

Upper Division:

  • ENVS 393: Science, Politics, and Economics of Climate Change
  • ENVS 493: Climate and the Earth System

Michael Hekkers

Term Faculty

Phone: 796-6523 Fax: 796-6406

Email:

Arts and Sciences - Natural Sciences - Environmental Sciences

Hendrickson Bldg, Rm. 107

Juneau Campus

Kim R. Homan

GIS Coordinator

Phone: 796-6051

Email:

Arts and Sciences - Natural Sciences - Environmental Sciences

Anderson Bldg, Fish House 353

Juneau Campus

Jason B. Fellman

Post Doctoral Fellow

Phone: 796-6370

Email:

Arts and Sciences - Natural Sciences - Environmental Sciences

Anderson Bldg, Fish House

Juneau Campus

Roman Motyka

Research Professor Emeritus, Geophysical Institute, UAF

Phone: 796-6307

Email:

Arts and Sciences - Natural Sciences - Environmental Sciences

Juneau Campus

http://www.uas.alaska.edu/arts_sciences/naturalsciences/envs

Ph.D. Geology and Geophysics, 1983, Geophysical Institute, University of Alaska, Fairbanks, AK
Doctoral Dissertation: Increases and fluctuations in thermal activity at Mount Wrangell, Alaska, determined from glacier melt and mass balance.

M.S. Physics, 1966, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI

B.A. Physics, 1964, St. Mary's University, Winona, MN
Honors thesis title: Construction of a mass spectrometer.

Curriculum vitae (PDF|48Kb) Complete list of publications (PDF|114Kb)

  • Tidewater glacier dynamics (LeConte, Taku, and Hubbard Glaciers, SE Alaska; Jakobshavn Isbrae, Greenland)
  • Thinning of Mendenhall Glacier and disintegration of its calving terminus in Mendenhall Lake, SE Alaska
  • Uplift, isostatic rebound, and plate tectonics in Southeast Alaska (NSF)
  • Contribution of Alaska glaciers to global sea level raise (NASA)
  • Developing ice-load models for Glacier Bay and for the Yakutat Icefield, SE Alaska (NASA)
Selected Publications

Brian Buma

Asst. Professor of Forest Ecosystem Ecology

Phone: 796-6410

Email:

Arts and Sciences - Natural Sciences, Arts and Sciences - Natural Sciences - Environmental Sciences,

Soboleff Annex, 108

Juneau Campus

http://www.brianbuma.com

University of Colorado, Boulder- Ph.D. - Dept. of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology

•Landscape-scale interacting disturbances and successional trajectories of recovering vegetation, resilience of corresponding ecosystem services in a changing climate, the role of management.

Western Washington University- M.A. - Masters in Teaching, Woodring College of Education                                                                                                                                         

•Thesis:  Inquiry education in high school science
•Multicultural science education

Western Washington University- B.S.   - Biology Department

• B.S. Biology, minor in Chemistry

 Curriculum Vitae                                                                                                                                                                  

•Hi’iaka sustainability science program, linking indigenous and academic research (current)

•NSF NOVUS research coordination network (Biogeochemical Environments, current)

•Ecological Society of America (2007-current)

•International Association of Landscape Ecology (2008-current)

•Society for Conservation Biology (2008-2010)

Geography  

Phones

Information: 796-6000

Email

Address

Soboleff Bldg

11120 Glacier Hwy

Juneau, AK 99801

Cathy L. Connor

Professor of Geology, Environmental Science Program Coordinator

Phone: 796-6293 Fax: 796-6406

Email:

Arts and Sciences - Natural Sciences - Environmental Sciences

Soboleff Annex, Rm. 106

Juneau Campus

http://www.uas.alaska.edu/pub/CLCONNOR

Ph.D. Geology 1984, University of Montana, Missoula, MT
Doctoral Dissertation: Late Quaternary Glaciolacustrine and Vegetational History of the Copper River Basin, Southcentral Alaska.

M.S. Geology 1975, Stanford University, Stanford, CA
Masters thesis: Holocene Sedimentation History of Richardson Bay California.

B.S. Geology 1974, Stanford University, Stanford, CA

Curriculum vitae (PDF | 149Kb)

Quaternary Geology and Paleoecology, Regional Alaskan Geology, Glaciology, Neotectonic Processes, Geoscience Education

  • Outreach in Geoscience Education in Alaska′s secondary schools
  • Alaska Geology–Understanding how it all came together and how it is changing
  • Comparison of Neoglacial stratigraphy with Tlingit Oral History Glacier Bay
  • Geomorphic Evolution of Mendenhall Valley during repeated glaciations
  • Uplift in Northern Southeastern Alaska
  • The Little Ice Age retreat of Mendenhall Glacier and Comparison with early 21st Century Rapid Retreat
  • Sediment flux through the Mendenhall Glacier/River system
  • Bathymetric surveys Mendenhall Lake 2000–2003
  • Recent Paleoecology SE AK fjord basins–Gravity Core studies marine sediments
  • Calving Retreat LeConte Glacier 1996–2000
Selected Publications

Lower Division:

  • GEOL 104 – Introductory Physical Geology & Lab
  • GEOL 105 – Historical Geology
  • Environmental Geology
  • ENVS 101 – Introduction to Environmental Science & Lab
  • GEOL 271 – Earth Materials (Mineralogy & Petrology) with Lab
  • ENVS 111 – Introduction to GPS
  • ENVS 110 – Introduction to ArcGIS
  • Introduction to Geologic Field Methods (for undergraduates, for AK secondary science teachers)
  • Introduction to Field Archeology

Upper Division:

  • GEOL 301 – Geomorphology
  • GEOL 300 – Geology of Alaska (Emphasis on Structure & Tectonics)
  • GEOL 310 – Glaciation and Climate Change
  • GEOL 315 – Field Course Glacier Surveying
  • ENVS 491 – Environmental Science Internship
  • ENVS 492 – Environmental Science Seminar (Capstone Course)
  • Independent Studies
  • Geology and Geomorphology of the Tatshenshini and Lower Alsek Rivers
  • Juneau Icefield Research Program Courses

Eran Hood

Professor of Environmental Science

Phone: 796-6244 Fax: 796-6406

Email:

Arts and Sciences - Natural Sciences - Environmental Sciences

Soboleff Annex, Rm. 102

Juneau Campus

Ph.D. Geography 2002, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO
M.A. Geography 1998, University of Colorado, Boulder,CO
A.B.  Biology 1991, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA

Curriculum vitae

  • Watershed-scale biogeochemistry
  • Nutrient cycling in aquatic systems
  • Alpine hydrology
  • Snow hydrology and snow chemistry
Selected Publications

Lower Division:

  • ENVS 101 – Introduction to Environmental Science & Lab
  • ENVS 111 – Introduction to Differential GPS

Upper Division:

  • GEOL 302 – Hydrology
  • ENVS 397 – IS: Nature of Soils
  • ENVS 404 – Snow Hydrology
  • ENVS 408 – Biogeochemistry
  • ENVS 491 – Environmental Science Internship
  • ENVS 492 – Undergraduate Research Seminar
  • ENVS 493 – Glacier Surveying
  • ENVS 493 – Snow and Glaciers
  • ENVS 494 – Practicum: Snow Hydrology
  • ENVS 497 – IS: Field/Snow Hydrology
  • ENVS 497 – IS: Rsrch.: Snow Infl. on Forage

Sanjay Pyare

Associate Professor of GIS and Landscape Ecology, Geography BS Program Coordinator

Phone: 796-6007 Fax: 796-6406

Email:

Arts and Sciences - Natural Sciences - Environmental Sciences

Juneau Campus

Ph.D. Ecology, Evolution, and Conservation Biology 1999, University of Nevada, Reno, NV
Doctoral Dissertation: Interrelationships among northern flying squirrels, ectomycorrhizal fungi, and conifers in old-growth forest habitat of the Sierra Nevada

B.A. Biology (Studio Art Minor), Hartwick College, Oneonta, NY
Senior Thesis: Habitat Use by Eastern Chipmunks

Curriculum vitae (PDF|85Kb)

  • GIS-supported landscape assessments
  • Ground-truthing GIS and remotely sensed resources
  • Landscape connectivity, habitat modeling, animal dispersal/movement
  • Aquatic-terrestrial-marine interactions
  • Hands-on/experiential education
  • Supporting information needs of resource managers
Selected Publications

Lower Division:

  • ENVS 110 – Intro to ArcGIS
  • ENVS 111 – Intro to Differential GPS
  • ENVS 293 – ST: Mobile GIS Technology Applications
  • ENVS 2xx – Biogeography of Southeast Alaska

Upper Division:

  • ENVS 310 –Intro to GIS
  • ENVS 393 – Advanced GIS
  • ENVS 4xx –Landscape Ecology
  • ENVS 403 –Remote Sensing
  • ENVS 493 –ST:Special Projects in GIS and Remote Sensing

Kevin Krein

Associate Professor of Philosophy, Director of Outdoor Studies

Phone: 796-6362

Email:

Arts and Sciences - Humanities

Soboleff Bldg, 214

Juneau Campus

In addition to working as academic director of Outdoor Studies, Kevin also teaches philosophy at UAS. Kevin's primary philosophical work is in the areas of philosophy of nature and the environment and philosophy of mind. His outdoor interests are centered around alpine skiing and ski mountaineering. Kevin brings over 10 years of experience of backcountry skiing and ski mountaineering in the Chugach, Alaska, and Coast ranges of Alaska. His accomplishments include a ski descent of Denali from summit to base camp.

Daniel Monteith

Associate Professor of Anthropology

Phone: 796-6413 Fax: 796-6406

Email:

Arts and Sciences - Social Sciences, Anthropology,

Soboleff Bldg, 221

Juneau Campus

Ph.D., Michigan State University. Dr. Monteith specializes in ethnohistory, economic anthropology, cultural ecology pertaining to subsistence, Tlingit art and oral narratives, and archeology of Southeast Alaska; his geographical areas of interest include Alaska, the Russian Far East, and Siberia.

While in Chicago he worked at the Field Natural History Museum and Oriental Institute Museum. As a student his summers were spent working in the fishing industry in Bristol Bay. This experience led him to his current research, which is an anthropological study of the Bristol Bay fishery.

Daniel has a wide range of practical experience. In 1992-93 he was employed by the Forest Service as an archeologist in the Ketchikan area of the Tongass National Forest. He then worked for the Tongass Tribe on a federal project; and during 1995-96 in the Economic Development Center at the UAS- Ketchikan Campus. In 1998 he became the Executive Director of Historic Ketchikan.

Curriculum Vitae

Kevin Maier

Associate Professor of English

Phone: 796-6021 Fax: 796-6406

Email:

Arts and Sciences - Humanities

Juneau Campus

Ph.D. Department of English.  University of Oregon. 2006. Structured Emphasis in Literature and Environment.  Passed oral examination with distinction.

Dissertation: "The Environmental Rhetoric of American Hunting and Fishing Narratives: A Revisionist History" (Chair: Suzanne Clark).

 M.A. Department of English.  University of Oregon.  2002. 

 B.A. Department of English.  Western Washington University.  1997. 

Cum Laude.  Junior Semester abroad, University of Hull, England.

PEER REVIEWED PUBLICATIONS:

  •  Introduction and co-editor with Sarah Jaquette Ray. Critical Norths: Space, Nature, Theory. In progress. 
  • Introduction and editor.  Teaching Hemingway and the Natural World.  Under Contract with Kent State UP.  
  • "Hunting." Ernest Hemingway in Context. Ed. Suzanne del Gizzo and Debra Moddelmog. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 2012. 267-276.  
  • "'A Trick Men Learn in Paris': Hemingway, Esquire, and Mass Tourism." The Hemingway Review 31.2 (2012): 65-83.
  • "Hemingway's Ecotourism:  Under Kilimanjaro and the Ethics of African Travel." ISLE: Interdisciplinary Studies in Literature and Environment. 18.4 (2011): 717-736.
  • "Hemingway's Hunting:  An Ecological Reconsideration."  The Hemingway Review.  25.2 (2006): 119-122.
  • Contributing editor. The Shape of Reason: Argumentative Writing in College. John T. Gage.  Fourth edition. Boston: Allyn and Bacon, 2004.          

BOOK REVIEWS:

  • Review of Trout. (James Owen).  ISLE: Interdisciplinary Studies in Literature and Environment 20.2 (2013): 440-441.
  • Review of Surfer Girls in the New World Order. (Krista Comer). ISLE: Interdisciplinary Studies in Literature and Environment 19.1(2012): 200-201.   
  • Review of Catching the Ebb: Drift Fishing for a Living in Cook Inlet. (Bert Bender). ISLE: Interdisciplinary Studies in Literature and Environment 18.1(2011): 221-222.
  • Double review of The Accidental Explorer: Wayfinding in Alaska. (Sherry Simpson) and Living with Wildness: An Alaskan Odyssey(Bill Sherwonit). ISLE: Interdisciplinary Studies in Literature and Environment 16.4 (2009): 886-868.
  • Review of In Darkest Alaska: Travel and Empire Along the Inside Passage. Robert Campbell. Western American Literature 43.4 (2009): 422-423. 
  • Review of Speaking of Earth: Environmental Speeches that Moved the World. Edited by Alon Tal.  ISLE: Interdisciplinary Studies in Literature and Environment 15.2 (2008): 284-285.

PRESENTATIONS:

   National and International Conferences:

  • “ASLE Juneau: The Report from the 2012 Off-Year Symposium.” Association for the Study of Literature and Environment Biennial Conference, Bloomington, Indiana. June 2013.  
  • "Teaching Hemingway and the Natural World: How, Why, When, What." 15 th Biennial Hemingway Society Conference. Petoskey, Michigan. June 2012
  • "Poaching, Hunting, and Environmentalism in D'Arcy McNickle's 'Meat for God' and The Surrounded." 46 th Annual Western Literature Association Conference, Missoula, Montana. October 2011.
  • "Guns, Bikes, and Helicopters: An Ecological Apologia for Leisure." Association for the Study of Literature and Environment Biennial Conference, Bloomington, IN. June 2011. 
  • "Building your Professional Identity: Funding, Publishing, and Conferencing." Association for the Study of Literature and Environment Biennial Conference, Bloomington, IN. June 2011.
  • "'A Trick Men Learn in Paris': Hemingway, Esquire, and Mass Tourism." 14 th Biennial International Hemingway Society Conference. Lausanne, Switzerland.  June 2010.
  • "Environmental Humanities in the Undergraduate Curriculum: Lessons from a Small Public Liberal Arts Institution."  American Society for Environmental History. Portland, OR, March 2010.
  • "World-making Through Alternative Sport Films."  Co-presentation with Kevin Krein.  International Association for the Philosophy of Sport Conference, Seattle, WA. August 2009.
  • "Dissolving Disciplines, Resolving Questions:  The Challenges of Interdisciplinary Undergraduate Education at a Small Open-Admissions University." Association for the Study of Literature and Environment Biennial Conference, Victoria, BC.  June 2009.
  • "Traces of the Industrial Sublime: Salmon Hatcheries and Tourism in Southeast Alaska" Western Literature Association Conference, Boulder, CO. October 2008.
  • "Stuck in Raymond Carver's America." Western Literature Association Conference, Tacoma, WA. October 2007.
  • "Hemingway's Ecotourism:  Under Kilimanjaro and the Ethics of African Travel." American Literature Association Conference, Boston, MA. May 2007.
  • "Hemingway's Hunting:  An Ecological Reconsideration." International Ernest Hemingway Society Conference, Ronda, Spain. June 2006.
  • "The Conservation of Sporting Literature:  The Environmental Rhetoric of American Sporting Narratives."  Association for the Study of Literature and Environment Conference, Eugene, OR.  June 2005.
  • "Hatching Wildness: The Rhetoric of Wild Salmon." Association for the Study of Literature and Environment Conference, Boston, MA.  June 2003.

   Regional:

  • "The Captivity Narrative: Mary Rowlandson and the advent of a genre" (English 223 Survey of British and American Literature). UAS April 2012.
  • "The centrality of Critical Thinking and the Liberal Arts Tradition."  National Teach-In in response to Corporate Greed, part of session entitled "The History of Unions and the Ascendancy of Capital." UAS. April 2011.
  • "Between Science and Anti-Science:  What does Science have to do with Literary Study?" (English 423 Ecocriticism). UAS December 2010.
  • "All Things Sustainable: The Report from UAS." Presentation at All Things Sustainable Roundtable. University of Alaska Fairbanks. April 2010.
  • "Salmon Hatcheries and Mass Tourism in Southeast Alaska."  UAS Spring Forum on Animals.  March 2010.
  • "Traces of the Industrial Sublime: Hardrock Mines, Salmon Hatcheries, and Mass Tourism in Southeast Alaska." Guest Lecture (Video-recorded).  English 365 (Alaska Literature: Native and Non-native Perspectives). February 2010.
  • "Salmon Hatcheries and Industrial Tourism in Juneau: An Ecological Approach to Interdisciplinary Research."  University of Alaska Southeast.  Interdisciplinary Brown Bag Work-in-Progress Series.  October 2008. 
  • "D'Arcy McNickle's The Surrounded and the Imperialist Ramifications of Sport." University of Alaska Southeast.  Guest Lecture, English 418: The West in Books and Film. July 2007.
  • "Steelhead Flyfishing: A Literary History." University of Alaska Southeast. Guest Lecture, Outdoor Studies 293: Fly Fishing.  April 2007. 
  • "Make it new?  Make it Local: On the Necessity of Teaching Local Issues in Composition." University of Oregon Fall Composition Conference.  September 2005.
  • "Preparing to teach Composition for the First Time."  Guest Lecture.  University of Oregon. English 611: Composition Instructor Training Seminar.  March 2004.
  • "Teaching A Forest of Voices."  University of Oregon.  English 611: Composition Instructor Training Seminar.  February 2003.
  • "Ecocomposition and the Politics of Teaching."  University of Oregon Fall Composition Conference.  September 2002.

ASSOCIATION MEMBERSHIPS:

  • Association for the Study of Literature and Environment
  • Western Literature Association
  • The Hemingway Society

TEACHING EXPERIENCE:

 Associate Professor of English.  University of Alaska Southeast. 2013-present.

 Assistant Professor of English.  University of Alaska Southeast. 2006-2013. 

 Visiting Assistant Professor of English. University of Alaska Southeast.  2004-2005.

 Courses taught (UAS):

  • English 493: Travel Writing (Independent Study) Fall 2006.
  • English 423: Ecocriticism.  Spring 2008.
  • English 420: The History of the American Novel. Fall 2009.
  • English 419: Major Authors, Ernest Hemingway.  Fall 2010.  Major Authors, Ernest Hemingway and William Faulkner. Spring 2007.
  • English 418: Perspectives on the Animal. Team-Taught with philosopher Dr. Kevin Krein. Spring 2009.
  • English 418: Hemingway in Cuba. Spring 2012.
  • English 418: Environment, Culture, and Place in a Rapidly Changing North. Co-Taught with Dr. Sarah Ray. Spring 2012.
  • English 418: The Wilderness Act at 50: A Critical and
  • English 363: Nature Writing.  Fall 2004.  Fall 2006.  Fall 2008.  Fall 2010.  Fall 2012.
  • English 303: Literature and the Environment.  Fall 2007. Spring 2009.  Spring 2010.  Spring 2011. Spring 2012.
  • English 226: Survey of American Literature II, 1865-present. Spring 2005. Spring 2007. Fall 2008.  Spring 2010. Fall 2010 (Directed Study). Fall 2011.   
  • English 225: Survey of American Literature I, Beginnings to 1865. Fall 2004. Fall 2006. 
  • English 215: Introduction to Literary Criticism.  Fall 2008 (Directed Study).  Spring 2009.  Spring 2012 (Directed Study).
  • English 111: Methods of Written Communication. Fall 2004 (two sections). Spring 2005 (two sections). Fall 2007 (two sections). Spring 2008 (two sections). Fall 2008.  Fall 2009.  Spring 2011. Summer 2011. Fall 2011. Summer 2012.
  • English 110: Basic College Writing. Spring 2007.
  • Humanities 393: Cuban Language, Literature, and Culture. Team taught in country with Dr. Dan Monteith, Claudia Wakefield, and Forest Wagner. Spring 2012.
  • Humanities 393: Climate Change, Climate Solutions: Seminar on Climate Change Advocacy and Activism. Summer 2008.
  • Humanities 200: Introduction to the Liberal Arts.  Spring 2011. Fall 2013.
  • Humanities 120: Sense of Place, Alaska and Beyond.  Team taught. Fall 2009. Fall 2010 (lead instructor).  Fall 2011 (lead instructor). Fall 2012 (lead instructor).  Fall 2013 (lead instructor).
  • Humanities 193: Environment, Ethics, and the UAS Experience.  Team taught with Geologist Dr. Sonia Nagorski.  Summer 2007.
  • Philosophy 271: Perspectives on the Natural World. Fall 2006.
  • Outdoor Studies 293: Fly Fishing II: Service Learning and Steelheading. Spring 2011.  Spring 2012. Spring 2013.
  • Outdoor Studies 193: Introduction to Fly Fishing.  Fall 2010. Fall 2011. Fall 2012.  Fall 2013. 

 Thesis Committees (UAS):

      • Advisor.  Ben Crozier, "Images of the Arctic: A Literary Review."  2008. 
      • Advisor.  Jess Eller, "Salmon Hatcheries and Alaska."  2010.
      • Committee. Seth Griffin, "Chinese Environmental Literature."  2011. 

 Graduate Teaching Fellow.  University of Oregon.  Fall 2000-Spring 2004, Fall 2005, Spring 2006.   

   Courses taught (UO):

  • English 410: Americans in Paris.  (Assistant to Dr. George Wickes).  Summer 2002.
  • English 222: Introduction to the Major III: American and British Literature, 1789-present.  (Discussion sections for Dr. Paul Peppis). Spring 2004.  Spring 2006. 
  • Writing 121: College Composition I.  Fall 2001. Winter 2003. Summer 2004.
  • Writing 122: College Composition II.  Winter 2002. Spring 2002. Fall 2002. Spring 2003. Fall 2005.  

 Writing Lab Fellow.  University of Oregon. Academic Learning Services.  2000-2001. 

AWARDS, HONORS, GRANTS:

  • UAS Faculty Excellence Award for Service, 2010-2011. 
  • Alaska EPSCoR, National Science Foundation Travel Grant. Spring 2009. 
  • Wilson Fund Travel Grant. Spring 2007. Fall 2007. Fall 2008. Fall 2009.  Spring 2010. Spring 2011. Fall 2011.  Fall 2012.
  • International Polar Year, National Science Foundation Outreach Grant, funding for Humanities 393 Course.  Summer 2008.
  • University of Alaska Special Projects for Retention, funding for Humanities 193 Course. Summer 2007.  
  • Outstanding Composition Teacher Award.  Department of Composition, University of Oregon.  2001-2002. 

SERVICE:

    National:

  • Co-coordinator, Association for the Study of Literature and Environment Off-year Symposium, “Environment, Culture, and Place in a Rapidly Changing North.” University of Alaska, June 2012.

   Regional:

  • United Academics Faculty Union, AAUP/AFT Local 4996, Area Representative, 2009-2012. 
  • Alaska State Writer's Consortium, Board Member.  National Writing Project.  2007-2009.

    University of Alaska Southeast: (selected)

  • Geography and Environmental Studies BA Degree Program Coordinator.  Spring 2013-present.
  • English BA Degree Program Coordinator. Fall 2009-Fall 2014.
  • Co-Director of Writing. Fall 2010-present.
  • UAS Sustainability Committee, Chair, Fall 2009-present. Co-chair, 2008-2009.
  • Assistant Director of Composition.  2009-2010
  • Coordinator of Humanities 120, Freshman Seminar course.  Fall 2010, Fall 2011, Fall 2012.
  • One Campus, One Book Selection Committee, 2011.
  • "I'm going to college" Program for 5 th-graders. Yakutat School District. Yakutat, Alaska.  May 2010. May 2011. May 2012. May 2013.
  • "Why College, Why UAS?" Recruiting program, Yakutat School District.  May 2010.  May 2011. May 2012. May 2013.
  • Faculty Mentor, Guide Program for first-time Freshmen.  2009-2010.
  • Chair, English Search Committee. 2008-2009.
  • Communication Search Committee. 2008-2009.
  • Faculty Advisor, UAS Bike Club. 2007-2009.
  • Chancellor's Task Force on Retention, Learning Communities Sub-Committee. Spring 2007-2009.
  • Portfolio Review Committee, English 110: Basic College Writing.  Fall 2006-Spring 2009.
  • Editorial Board, Tidal Echoes (UAS literary journal). 2009. 2012.
  • Learning Center Writing Placement Test Scoring Committee, Spring 2008. 
  • English Curriculum Committee, 2006-2008. 
  • Co-Coordinator, UAS Spring Forum: Sustainability and Juneau Energy. 2007-2008.
  • Co-Coordinator, UAS Spring Forum on Sustaining Culture, Community, and Environment.  2006-2007.
  • Steering committee, Pacific Rim Forum: Interdisciplinary Conference on Economics and the Environment. 2004-2005.
  • Chair, Bachelor of Liberal Arts Final Portfolio Committee.  2006-2007.
  • English Search Committee. 2005-2006.
  • Bachelor of Liberal Arts Junior Portfolio Reader. 2004-5.

   University of Oregon:

  • Association for the Study of Literature and Environment, Host Institution Steering

Committee for 2005 Biennial Conference.

  • Writing 122 College Composition II Curriculum Committee/Pilot Project.  2004. 
  • Composition Program Grammar Handbook Selection Committee.  2004
  • Assistant Director of Composition.  2003-2004.
  • Coordinator, University of Oregon Fall Composition Conference.  September 2003.
  • Composition Committee.  2002-2003.
  • Shop Steward.  Graduate Teaching Fellows Federation Union. 2001-2004.

 Community

  • 50th Anniversary of the Wilderness Act Celebration, Organizing Committee Summer 2013-present
  • Glory Hole Garden Evaluation Team, 2012-2013.
  • Discovery Southeast, Board Member.  2010-2013.
  • Poetry in the Parks, Juneau City and Bureau Program, Organizing Committee. 2009.
  • Bike to Work Week, Co-coordinator. 2006-2009.
  • Salmon Watch Volunteer.  Oregon Trout, Western Oregon Region.  2002-2004. 
  • Books to Prisoners, Seattle WA. Volunteer.  1998-2000. 
  • Copper Canyon Press, Port Townsend, WA.  Intern. Summer 1997.

TEACHING TRAINING:

  • Seminar on Writing Across the Disciplines with Dr. John Gage. University of Oregon. Invited participant. Winter 2003.
  • Teaching Effectiveness Program, Classroom Observation.  University of Oregon.  Winter 2002.  
  • Composition Instructor Training Series. University of Oregon.  Winter-Fall 2001.

 

John Radzilowski

Associate Professor of History

Phone: 228-4541

Email:

Arts and Sciences - Social Sciences, History,

Paul Bldg, Room 503

Ketchikan Campus

Ph.D., 1999, Arizona State University, specializing in Modern U.S. History, Russia/Eastern Europe, and Public History.

Certificate in Scholarly Publishing, 1994, Arizona State University.

BA, 1989, History, Southwest Minnesota State University.

Hello! Dzień dobry! Buenas días! Welcome to my faculty homepage!

I teach history and geography at UAS. Over the years, I’ve held a variety of jobs ranging from farm laborer, to small-town journalist, to research assistant to a member of the British parliament, to freelance writer. I joined the UAS faculty on the Ketchikan campus in fall 2007. Prior to moving to Alaska, I taught history courses at University of St. Thomas, Hamline University, and Anoka-Ramsey Community College in Minnesota. I also served as assistant project director at Center for Nations in Transition, at the Hubert H. Humphrey Institute of Public Affairs at the University of Minnesota where I helped design and administer USAID and State Department-sponsored training programs for business, economics, and political science faculty and NGO leaders in Ukraine and east central Europe.

My research and teaching interests are wide-ranging and diverse: immigration and ethnicity, military history, war and genocide, the impact of technology on the history and geography of the Great Plains and Midwest, local and regional studies, and the history of Poland and central and eastern Europe. My current research topics include immigrant demography and epidemiology, crime and deviance among Polish immigrants in the U.S., the ethnic groups of southeast Alaska, anti-communism among American ethnic groups, and the problems of modern Polish history. I am currently editing a collected volume of translated articles on the activities of the communist security services in Poland since 1944. This will be the first book of published research in English based on previous closed files of secret police.

I am a fellow at the Piast Institute: A National Center for Polish and Polish-American Affairs and past president of the Polish American Cultural Institute of Minnesota. I am also currently contributing editor for the Encyclopedia of American Immigration (second edition). I am the author or co-author of 13 books including Traveler’s History of Poland (2007), Minnesota (2006), The Eagle and the Cross: A History of Polish Roman Catholic Union of America (2003), and Community of Strangers: Change, Turnover, and Turbulence and the Transformation of a Midwestern Country Town (1999). I’ve also written numerous reports, articles, and reviews in publications such as Journal of American Ethnic History, Polin: Studies in Polish Jewry, Polish American Studies, American Heritage of Invention and Technology, and Minnesota History. In 2006, I received the Oskar Halecki Prize from the Polish American Historical Association for my book Poles in Minnesota.

Curriculum vitae 

Erica Hill

Associate Professor of Anthropology

Phone: 796-6017 Fax: 796-6406

Email:

Arts and Sciences - Social Sciences, Anthropology,

Soboleff Bldg, 217

Juneau Campus

Erica received her Ph.D. from the University of New Mexico in 1999. She has archaeological excavation experience in Alaska, Florida, the Southwest, Mexico, Peru, and the Russian Far East and has conducted ethnographic fieldwork in Honduras.

Erica is a broadly trained archaeologist with a background in medieval studies. She is interested in all aspects of ancient art and religion, especially the cross-cultural study of funerary ritual and sacrifice. Her most recent work involves reconstructing the religion of the Moche of Peru, a pre-Inca culture of the Pacific coast of South America.

She recently explored how the Moche conceptualized human body parts and the ways in which bones, particularly the skull, serve as objects of danger and desire in a chapter in “Skull Collection, Modification and Decoration,” edited by Michelle Bonogofsky. Erica has also published a book chapter and articles on the Moche in the journals Antiquity, Journal of Material Culture, and Cambridge Archaeological Journal and has a book chapter forthcoming in Religion, Archaeology, and the Material World, edited by Lars Fogelin.

Erica is also a zooarchaeologist and has worked with faunal assemblages from across the United States and from Chukotka, in the Russian Far East. She is interested in the exploitation of terrestrial and marine mammals in the North Pacific and in reconstructing the ritual uses of archaeological faunas. She is especially interested in the cross-cultural practice of animal burial and explored how the prehistoric Anasazi, Mimbres, Mogollon, and inhabitants of Casas Grandes treated animals in a 2000 article in the journal Kiva.

Erica teaches a variety of courses at UAS, including Biological Anthropology, Zooarchaeology, and Ethnobiology, plus surveys of archaeology, including Ancient Civilizations.

When she isn’t teaching or writing, Erica loves to travel. She is also an avid birdwatcher and can be found tramping through the forests on the weekends looking for warblers. She reads historical fiction and the New York Times Book Review with equal enthusiasm.

Mathematics  

Phones

Information: 796-6518

Fax: 796-6406

Email

Address

Soboleff Bldg

11120 Glacier Hwy (SOB 1)

Juneau, AK 99801

Brian Blitz

Professor of Mathematics & Program Coordinator

Phone: 796-6506

Email:

Arts and Sciences - Natural Sciences - Math

Soboleff Annex, Rm 103

Juneau Campus

B.S. University of Chicago; M.S. Northern Arizona University; Ph.D. Washington State University.

Brian has been at UAS since 2000. He enjoys teaching all levels of mathematics courses. His specialized areas of interests include geometry, graph theory and algebra.

Outside of academics, Brian is a golf enthusiast (regular and frisbee) who enjoys hiking, biking, kayaking and snowboarding.

Megan Buzby

Assistant Professor of Mathematics

Phone: 796-6240

Email:

Arts and Sciences - Natural Sciences - Math

Soboleff Bldg, Rm 210

Juneau Campus

B.S. in Mathematics and Physics, Adams State College, CO. M.S. and Ph.D. in Mathematics, Colorado State University, CO.

Megan started at UAS in Fall 2009. In addition to teaching mathematics, probability, and statistics, she is interested in interdisciplinary teaching and research. Her research interests include applications of probability modeling, in particular with respect to ecology and biology, as well as numerical and error analyses.

Outside of academics, Megan enjoys most things active and done with friends. At the top of the current list is trail running, volleyball, and Latin dancing. When time allows, she also enjoys cooking & baking, watching movies, and catching (& gutting) fish.

Jill Dumesnil

Professor of Mathematics, Associate Dean of Arts & Sciences

Phone: 796-6242

Email:

Arts and Sciences - Natural Sciences - Math

Soboleff Bldg, Rm 225

Juneau Campus

B.S. Lamar University; M.S. and Ph.D. Louisiana State University.

Jill has been at UAS since 2005. She enjoys teaching all levels of mathematics courses and particularly enjoys the opportunity to interact with students both in and out of the classroom.  Her specialized areas of interest include algebra and number theory.

Outside of academics, Jill enjoys raising her two sons, exploring the area's plants and animals whenever possible, reading and scrapbooking and has a budding interest in photography.

Derek J Eby

Term Assistant Professor of Mathematics

Phone: 796-6392 Fax: 796-6406

Email:

Arts and Sciences - Natural Sciences - Math

Hendrickson Bldg, Rm. 203-B

Juneau Campus

http://www.uas.alaska.edu/math

MA Mathematics from University of Colorado

Academic interests include probability/statistics, time series. Other interests include many outdoor activities, including hiking, biking, backpacking, camping, boating, and many other sports, including soccer, skiing/boarding and disc golf.

Chris Hay-Jahans

Associate Professor of Mathematics

Phone: 796-6408

Email:

Arts and Sciences - Natural Sciences - Math

Soboleff Annex, Rm 105

Juneau Campus

http://uashome.alaska.edu/~cnhayjahans/

B.S. University of Oregon; M.A. University of Maine; D.A. Idaho State University

Chris has been at UAS since 2002. He enjoys teaching any mathematics or statistics course. His specialized areas of interest include applications of differential equations to geophysical fluid dynamics and other areas within the natural sciences. More recently, he has also developed an interest in the theory and applications of linear statistical models.

Outside of academics, Chris enjoys dabbling with gardening and carpentry, hunting and fishing, hiking and camping, and canoeing (under ideal conditions).

Teresa Holt

Instructor, Mathematics

Phone: 747-7700

Email:

Arts and Sciences - Natural Sciences - Math

Sitka Campus

B.Ed., Texas Christian University; M.Ed in Special Education and Learning Disabilities, University of Alaska Anchorage

Began work at UAS in 1976,  has been teaching developmental math and remedial courses in mathematics at UAS  since l986 (MATH S054 and MATH S055), primarily distance delivered courses.

Colleen Ianuzzi

Associate Professor of Mathematics

Phone: 228-4502

Email:

Arts and Sciences - Natural Sciences - Math

Paul Bldg, Rm 509

Ketchikan Campus

B.S. in Wildlife Biology, University of Alaska Fairbanks; M.S. in Statistics, University of Alaska Fairbanks

Colleen began working at the UAS Ketchikan Campus in 2006. She teaches Math 105, Math 107, Math 108, Math 200 and Stat 273.

Outside of academics, Colleen enjoys hiking, cross-country skiing and skiijoring with her dog.

Joe Liddle

Associate Professor, Mathematics

Phone: 747-7792

Email:

Arts and Sciences - Natural Sciences - Math

Sitka Campus

B.S. in Mathematics, Northern Michigan University; M.S. in Mathematics, Western Washington University; M.S. in Statistics, University of Alaska Fairbanks

At UAS since 1996

Andrzej Piotrowski

Associate Professor of Mathematics

Phone: 796-6423

Email:

Arts and Sciences - Natural Sciences - Math

Soboleff Annex, Rm 106

Juneau Campus

http://uashome.alaska.edu/~APIOTROWSKI/

BS and MS, University of New Hampshire; PhD, University of Hawaii.

Andrzej has been at UAS since 2008. He enjoys teaching all levels of mathematics courses. His specialized areas of interests include real and complex analysis, theory of equations, and distribution of zeros of entire functions.

Outside of academics, Andrzej enjoys hiking, kayaking, camping, cross-country skiing and Frisbee-golf.

Beverley Siercks

Instructor of Mathematics

Phone: 772-4330

Email:

Arts and Sciences - Natural Sciences - Math

Sitka Campus

B.S. Mathematics, Minot State College; MAT in Mathematics, Minot State University

Has been teaching lower level and G.E.R. mathematics courses for UAS since 1999, primarily distance delivered courses.

Ron Seater

Professor of Mathematics (Retired)

Phone: 796-6410

Email:

Arts and Sciences - Natural Sciences - Math

Hendrickson Bldg, Rm 204

Juneau Campus

B.S. Southern Oregon College; M.S. Southern Oregon College.

At UAS 1984 - 2008.

Emeritus Faculty

Richard Gard

Professor of Fisheries, Emeritus

Phone: N/A

Email:

School of Fisheries and Ocean Sciences (JCSFOS)

Juneau Campus

Lewis Haldorson

Professor of Fisheries, Emeritus

Phone: N/A

Email:

School of Fisheries and Ocean Sciences (JCSFOS)

Juneau Campus

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