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Social Sciences

Phone

  • Information: 796-6163

Fax

  • Fax: 796-6406

Address

Soboleff Bldg
11120 Glacier Hwy (SOB1)
Juneau, AK 99801

Erica Hill

Associate Professor of Anthropology, Chair of Social Sciences

Phone: 796-6017Fax: 796-6406

Email:

Arts and Sciences - Social Sciences, Anthropology

Soboleff Bldg, 217, Juneau Campus

Juneau Campus

Education

Erica received her Ph.D. from the University of New Mexico in 1999. She has archaeological excavation experience in Alaska, Florida, the Southwest, Mexico, Peru, and the Russian Far East and has conducted ethnographic fieldwork in Honduras.

Biography

Erica is a broadly trained archaeologist with research interests in Peru and the Arctic. She received her B.A. from the University of Florida, and earned an M.A. and Ph.D. in Anthropology at the University of New Mexico. She has excavation experience in Alaska, Florida, the Southwest U.S, Mexico, Peru, and the Russian Far East and has conducted ethnographic fieldwork in Honduras.

Erica is interested in ancient belief systems and cosmology, especially the cross-cultural study of funerary ritual and sacrifice. Her work in Peru focuses on iconography and burial evidence of the Moche, a pre-Inca culture of the Pacific coast of South America. (Selected publications on the Moche)

More recently, Erica’s work has focused on the prehistory of human–animal relations in the Bering Sea region. She is particularly interested in how approaches from animal geography can be applied to archaeological evidence. (Selected publications on human–animal relations.)

Erica is the editor of Iñupiaq Ethnohistory: Selected Essays by Ernest S. Burch, Jr. (2013) and co-editor, with Jon B. Hageman, of The Archaeology of Ancestors: Death, Memory and Veneration (2016).

In 2016, Erica was selected to be a Fulbright–NSF Arctic Research Scholar. She will spend the fall of 2016 on sabbatical at the University of Iceland in Reykjavik.

Many of Erica’s publications are available at academia.edu and at ScholarWorks@UA.

Selected Publications on the Moche

2016    Identifying the Revered Dead in Moche Iconography, pp. 189–212 in Erica Hill and Jon B. Hageman, eds. The Archaeology of Ancestors: Death, Memory and Veneration. University Press of Florida, Gainesville, FL.

2013   Death, Emotion, and the Household among the Late Moche of Peru. In The Oxford Handbook of the Archaeology of Death and Burial, edited by Sarah Tarlow and Liv Nilsson Stutz, pp. 597–616. Oxford University Press, Oxford.

2008   Animism and Sacrifice: Reconstructing Moche Religion through Architecture, Iconography, and Archaeological Features. In Religion in the Material World, edited by Lars Fogelin, pp. 38–60. Center for Archaeological Investigations, Southern Illinois University, Carbondale, IL.

2006    Moche Skulls in Cross-Cultural Perspective, pp. 91–100 in Michelle Bonogofsky, ed. Skull Collection, Modification and Decoration. British Archaeology Reports (BAR) International Series 1539. Oxford, Archaeopress.

2003    Sacrificing: Moche Bodies, Journal of Material Culture 8(3):285–299.

2000    The Embodied Sacrifice, Cambridge Archaeological Journal 10(2):307–316.

1998    Death as a Rite of Passage: The Iconography of the Moche Burial Theme, Antiquity 72(277):528–538.

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Selected Publications on Human–Animal Relations

2013    Archaeology and Animal Persons: Toward a Prehistory of Human-Animal Relations, Environment &Society: Advances inResearch 4:117–136.

2012    The Nonempirical Past: Enculturated Landscapes and Other-than-Human Persons in Southwest Alaska. Arctic Anthropology 49(2):41–57.

2011    Animals as Agents: Hunting Ritual and Relational Ontologies in Prehistoric Alaska and Chukotka. Cambridge Archaeological Journal 21(3):407–426.

Social Sciences Faculty

Erica Hill

Associate Professor of Anthropology, Chair of Social Sciences

Phone: 796-6017Fax: 796-6406

Email:

Arts and Sciences - Social Sciences, Anthropology

Soboleff Bldg, 217, Juneau Campus

Juneau Campus

Education

Erica received her Ph.D. from the University of New Mexico in 1999. She has archaeological excavation experience in Alaska, Florida, the Southwest, Mexico, Peru, and the Russian Far East and has conducted ethnographic fieldwork in Honduras.

Biography

Erica is a broadly trained archaeologist with research interests in Peru and the Arctic. She received her B.A. from the University of Florida, and earned an M.A. and Ph.D. in Anthropology at the University of New Mexico. She has excavation experience in Alaska, Florida, the Southwest U.S, Mexico, Peru, and the Russian Far East and has conducted ethnographic fieldwork in Honduras.

Erica is interested in ancient belief systems and cosmology, especially the cross-cultural study of funerary ritual and sacrifice. Her work in Peru focuses on iconography and burial evidence of the Moche, a pre-Inca culture of the Pacific coast of South America. (Selected publications on the Moche)

More recently, Erica’s work has focused on the prehistory of human–animal relations in the Bering Sea region. She is particularly interested in how approaches from animal geography can be applied to archaeological evidence. (Selected publications on human–animal relations.)

Erica is the editor of Iñupiaq Ethnohistory: Selected Essays by Ernest S. Burch, Jr. (2013) and co-editor, with Jon B. Hageman, of The Archaeology of Ancestors: Death, Memory and Veneration (2016).

In 2016, Erica was selected to be a Fulbright–NSF Arctic Research Scholar. She will spend the fall of 2016 on sabbatical at the University of Iceland in Reykjavik.

Many of Erica’s publications are available at academia.edu and at ScholarWorks@UA.

Selected Publications on the Moche

2016    Identifying the Revered Dead in Moche Iconography, pp. 189–212 in Erica Hill and Jon B. Hageman, eds. The Archaeology of Ancestors: Death, Memory and Veneration. University Press of Florida, Gainesville, FL.

2013   Death, Emotion, and the Household among the Late Moche of Peru. In The Oxford Handbook of the Archaeology of Death and Burial, edited by Sarah Tarlow and Liv Nilsson Stutz, pp. 597–616. Oxford University Press, Oxford.

2008   Animism and Sacrifice: Reconstructing Moche Religion through Architecture, Iconography, and Archaeological Features. In Religion in the Material World, edited by Lars Fogelin, pp. 38–60. Center for Archaeological Investigations, Southern Illinois University, Carbondale, IL.

2006    Moche Skulls in Cross-Cultural Perspective, pp. 91–100 in Michelle Bonogofsky, ed. Skull Collection, Modification and Decoration. British Archaeology Reports (BAR) International Series 1539. Oxford, Archaeopress.

2003    Sacrificing: Moche Bodies, Journal of Material Culture 8(3):285–299.

2000    The Embodied Sacrifice, Cambridge Archaeological Journal 10(2):307–316.

1998    Death as a Rite of Passage: The Iconography of the Moche Burial Theme, Antiquity 72(277):528–538.

Top

Selected Publications on Human–Animal Relations

2013    Archaeology and Animal Persons: Toward a Prehistory of Human-Animal Relations, Environment &Society: Advances inResearch 4:117–136.

2012    The Nonempirical Past: Enculturated Landscapes and Other-than-Human Persons in Southwest Alaska. Arctic Anthropology 49(2):41–57.

2011    Animals as Agents: Hunting Ritual and Relational Ontologies in Prehistoric Alaska and Chukotka. Cambridge Archaeological Journal 21(3):407–426.

Daniel Monteith

Associate Professor of Anthropology

Phone: 796-6413Fax: 796-6406

Email:

Arts and Sciences - Social Sciences, Anthropology

Soboleff Bldg, 221, Juneau Campus

Juneau Campus

Education

Ph.D., Michigan State University. Dr. Monteith specializes in ethnohistory, economic anthropology, cultural ecology pertaining to subsistence, Tlingit art and oral narratives, and archeology of Southeast Alaska; his geographical areas of interest include Alaska, the Russian Far East, and Siberia.

Biography

Dan grew up in Seattle, Washington and went to the University of Chicago for a bachelor’s degree in anthropology. He earned a master’s degree and Ph.D. in anthropology from Michigan State University. He also holds a master’s degree in social science from the University of Chicago. While in Chicago he worked at the Field Natural History Museum and Oriental Institute Museum. As a student his summers were spent working in the fishing industry in Bristol Bay. This experience led him to his current research, which is an anthropological study of the Bristol Bay fishery.Daniel has a wide range of practical experience. In 1992-93 he was employed by the Forest Service as an archeologist in the Ketchikan area of the Tongass National Forest. He then worked for the Tongass Tribe on a federal project; and during 1995-96 in the Economic Development Center at the UAS- Ketchikan Campus. In 1998 he became the Executive Director of Historic Ketchikan. Curriculum Vitae

David Hoogland Noon

Associate Professor of History

Phone: 796-6329Fax: 796-6406

Email:

Arts and Sciences - Social Sciences, History

Soboleff Bldg, 215, Juneau Campus

Juneau Campus

Education

Ph.D., University of Minnesota. Dr. Noon earned his degree in American Studies and teaches all periods of U.S. history. He is particularly interested in the period between the Civil War and World War I; the history of race and social science; and contemporary debates about empire in American history.

Biography

David Noon has taught U.S. history on the UAS Juneau campus since Fall, 2002. His dissertation, “This is (Not) a Child: Race, Gender, and ‘Development’ in the Child Sciences, 1880-1910,” displays the full range of Dr. Noon's research interests in history, which include developmental psychology, criminology, medicine, and the social construction of race and gender. More recently, Dr. Noon has written about the use of World War analogies in contemporary political rhetoric, cold war historical memory in the fiction of Don DeLillo, and the work of neoconservatives and Christian prophecy writers in the war on terrorism.

Curriculum Vitae

John Radzilowski

Associate Professor of History

Phone: 228-4541

Email:

Arts and Sciences - Social Sciences, History

Paul Bldg, Room 503, Ketchikan Campus

Ketchikan Campus

Education

Ph.D., 1999, Arizona State University, specializing in Modern U.S. History, Russia/Eastern Europe, and Public History.

Certificate in Scholarly Publishing, 1994, Arizona State University.

BA, 1989, History, Southwest Minnesota State University.

Biography

Hello! Dzień dobry! Buenas días! Welcome to my faculty homepage!

I teach history and geography at UAS. Over the years, I’ve held a variety of jobs ranging from farm laborer, to small-town journalist, to research assistant to a member of the British parliament, to freelance writer. I joined the UAS faculty on the Ketchikan campus in fall 2007. Prior to moving to Alaska, I taught history courses at University of St. Thomas, Hamline University, and Anoka-Ramsey Community College in Minnesota. I also served as assistant project director at Center for Nations in Transition, at the Hubert H. Humphrey Institute of Public Affairs at the University of Minnesota where I helped design and administer USAID and State Department-sponsored training programs for business, economics, and political science faculty and NGO leaders in Ukraine and east central Europe.

My research and teaching interests are wide-ranging and diverse: immigration and ethnicity, military history, war and genocide, the impact of technology on the history and geography of the Great Plains and Midwest, local and regional studies, and the history of Poland and central and eastern Europe. My current research topics include immigrant demography and epidemiology, crime and deviance among Polish immigrants in the U.S., the ethnic groups of southeast Alaska, anti-communism among American ethnic groups, and the problems of modern Polish history. I am currently editing a collected volume of translated articles on the activities of the communist security services in Poland since 1944. This will be the first book of published research in English based on previous closed files of secret police.

I am a fellow at the Piast Institute: A National Center for Polish and Polish-American Affairs and past president of the Polish American Cultural Institute of Minnesota. I am also currently contributing editor for the Encyclopedia of American Immigration (second edition). I am the author or co-author of 13 books including Traveler’s History of Poland (2007), Minnesota (2006), The Eagle and the Cross: A History of Polish Roman Catholic Union of America (2003), and Community of Strangers: Change, Turnover, and Turbulence and the Transformation of a Midwestern Country Town (1999). I’ve also written numerous reports, articles, and reviews in publications such as Journal of American Ethnic History, Polin: Studies in Polish Jewry, Polish American Studies,American Heritage of Invention and Technology, and Minnesota History. In 2006, I received the Oskar Halecki Prize from the Polish American Historical Association for my book Poles in Minnesota.

Curriculum Vitae

Priscilla Schulte

Ketchikan Campus Director, Professor of Anthropology/Sociology

Phone: 228-4515Fax: 225-3624

Email:

Arts and Sciences - Social Sciences, Ketchikan Director's Office

Ziegler Bldg, Room 116A, Ketchikan Campus

Ketchikan Campus

http://www.uas.alaska.edu/ketchikan

Education

Ph.D., University of New Mexico. Dr. Schulte specializes in multicultural education, Alaska Native cultures, sociocultural change, and archaeology of southeast Alaska.

Biography

Priscilla Schulte has been teaching on the Ketchikan campus since 1980 and has been teaching distance classes for over ten years. Most of her students are in southeast Alaska, but some are from as far away as Connecticut. Priscilla has taught summer classes on the Juneau campus as well as distance delivery classes by video and audio conference to the Juneau campus. She teaches primarily lower division anthropology and sociology classes, as well as multicultural education classes.

Priscilla started her teaching career by teaching anthropology at Dine College (formerly Navajo Community College) now located in Tsaile, Arizona. Her anthropological fieldwork in Arizona and Chicago sparked her interest in completing an M.A. in anthropology at the University of Connecticut. During her years of living and teaching on the Navajo Nation, she began her doctoral work at the University of New Mexico which she completed after her move to Alaska in 1980.

Priscilla’s research and teaching interests are in multicultural education, Alaska Native cultures (primarily of southeast Alaska), and Native American culture change. She produced the video, “The Bear Stands Up,” which has aired on public television. Her most recent research has focused on the totem pole carvers of the CCC era. She is an adopted member of the Tongass Brown Bear clan of the Tlingit people. She is the mother of two daughters who have inspired and encouraged her in her research and teaching.

One of the most exciting events of Priscilla’s teaching year is the annual fieldtrip coordinated with the Forest Service to do archaeological and ethnographic fieldwork with local Native elders, cultural teachers, and UAS students. The field trips focus on the survey and inventory of important cultural sites located in southern southeast Alaska.

William Urquhart

Assistant Professor of Sociology

Phone: 228-4527Fax: 225-3624

Email:

Arts and Sciences Department, Arts and Sciences - Social Sciences, Sociology

Paul Bldg, Room 505, Ketchikan Campus

Ketchikan Campus

Education

Ph.D., MA, Tulane University
B.S., Oregon State University

William Urquhart’s recent doctoral dissertation on school violence and bullying includes ethnographic and statistical studies at a remote Western Alaska village and at an inner-city high school in pre-Katrina New Orleans.  This work emphasizes the importance of social account conversations in defining peer group norms for retaliation in disadvantaged areas, and will soon be published in book form as a monograph.  His other research interests include Alaskan social problems such as alcoholism and domestic violence, and organizational behavior perspectives on workplace violence.  Currently, he is investigating the effect of climatic temperature variation on seasonal domestic violence rate cycles in northern states.  He enjoys teaching distance education classes, and some of his course offerings include Theory and Research in Criminology, Social Psychology, and Alaska Social Problems; Deviant Behavior, Organizational Behavior, and Environmental Sociology.

Biography

Bill was born and raised in Ketchikan, following four generations of Alaska commercial fishermen, prospectors, and pioneer women.  His interest in sociology was piqued through his early experiences commercial fishing with his family, where he observed social change affecting the organizational structure of the industry.  Since returning to Alaska from New Orleans in 2002 for dissertation research, Bill has lived in several areas of the state, including time working as an educator and wrestling coach in Western Alaska and in Fairbanks. 

In addition to serving as an instructor at UAS, Bill is an independent consultant to several Alaska school districts, working with student information systems and federal and state data reporting.  Bill also plays the Scottish Great Highland Bagpipes; he is the Lead Bagpiper with Ketchikan’s Misty Thistle Pipes & Drums, and also performs at select solo engagements.  Bill enjoys spending his spare time with his wife Frankie, a science teacher in Ketchikan, and their small children, Liam, Neila, and Torran.

Other

Advising contact for all distance-based students in the Bachelor of Liberal Arts degree.

Robin Walz

Professor of History

Phone: 796-6433Fax: 796-6406

Email:

Arts and Sciences - Social Sciences, History

Soboleff Annex, Rm 104, Juneau Campus

Juneau Campus

Education

Ph.D. History, University of California at Davis (1994)
M.A. History, San Francisco State University (1988)
B.A. History, Whitworth College (1979)

Biography

Bonjour! I’m pleased that you have found your way to this page. I’ve been at UAS since 1997, and I am very happy here at our “Little Liberal Arts College in the Woods.” I teach surveys in World History, Early Modern Europe, and Modern Europe, and upper-divisions courses in European Intellectual History, the Holocaust, and European Popular Culture as part of the B.A. in Social Science. I also offer courses in the History of Women in Modern Europe and the History of Gender and Sexuality in the Women’s and Gender Studies Minor program. In May of alternate years, I help lead a UAS study tour of France as part of the Minor in French.

The history of popular culture in modern France is my area of research specialization. In 2000, the University of California Press published my Pulp Surrealism: Insolent Popular Culture in Early Twentieth-Century Paris, and I translated a Surrealist crime story parody “Death of Nick Carter,” by Philippe Soupault, from French into English for the literary review McSweeney’s Quarterly Concern issue 24.  I also write scholarly essays on French criminals, detectives, and avengers,  most recently on the criminal-turned-avenger Rocambole for The Re-Enchantment of the World: Secular Magic in a Rational Age, eds. Joshua Landy and Michael Saler (Stanford University Press,  2009).  In terms of my interests in intellectual history, I have written a book on Modernism (Pearson/Longman, 2008) as part of the series “Short Histories of Big Ideas,” and have an essay on “Modernism” in the edited collection Blackwell Companion to Europe 1900-1945 (Blackwell, 2006). 

My interest in French popular culture has spilled into various realms of mass media.  In 2005 I wrote the catalog preface for the exhibition Pulp Surrealism and Other Visions by the contemporary Australian painter Beric Henderson.  “The Genius of Crime” is my introduction to the Dover reissue (2006) of the classic French crime novel, Fantômas, by Pierre Souvestre and Marcel Allain (1911). If you want to know more about the surreal “Lord of Terror,” I encourage you to visit The Fantômas Website which I co-edit with my friend, Elliott Smith.  I was also invited to write the introduction, “Vidocq: Rogue Cop,” to the AK Press reissue of the Memoirs of Vidocq: Master of Crime (2003), and I got to be a “talking head” on a documentary short, “The Fugitive and the Pursuer: Vidocq” for the 20th Century Fox “Cinema Classics Collection” DVD (2007) re-issue of two Hollywood versions of Les Misérables (1935, 1952). 

In my spare time, I read contemporary French crime fiction.  Some of my favorite French polar (“hardboiled” crime) writers are Léo Malet, Didier Daeninckx, and Jean-Claude Izzo. My favorite bande déssinée (graphic novel) artist is Jacques Tardi. And I have a special fondness for the St. Cyr/Kohler crime series by Canadian author J. Robert Janes, set during the Nazi Occupation of France.

When not engaged in matters academic or French, for musical pleasure I play cello in the Juneau Symphony Orchestra and piano in the privacy of my living room. For physical activity I run, bicycle, and play squash, although I much prefer the leisurely pace of pétanque (or boules). My sweetie, Carol, provides me with emotional nourishment on a daily basis. Although more accustomed to reading bus schedules than tide tables, we love the natural beauty of mountains, sea, verdant flora and cached fauna that emerge from our temperate rain forest home.

Curriculum Vitae

Amanda K. Sesko

Assistant Professor of Psychology

Phone: 796-6436Fax: 796-6406

Email:

Arts and Sciences - Social Sciences

Soboleff Bldg, Rm 216, Juneau Campus

Juneau Campus

http://www.uas.alaska.edu/artssciences/socsci/

Education

Ph.D. Social Psychology (2011); Minor in Quantitative Psychology (2008), University of Kansas
M.A. Social Psychology, University of Kansas (2007)
B.A. Psychology; Minor in Women’s Studies, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 2004

Biography

My research focuses on stereotyping, prejudice, and social judgment with an emphasis on intersections of social categories. In my primary line of research I investigate the effects of prototypical standards of race and gender on social perceptions and judgments of individuals. Specifically I am interested in understanding the processes and outcomes of invisibility as a unique form of discrimination that may be experienced by groups that do not fit race and gender prototypes – e.g., Black women (Sesko & Biernat, 2010; Biernat & Sesko, 2013; Sesko & Biernat, under revision for resubmission). I conceptualize invisibility as a lack of individuation of or lack of differentiation among group members (Sesko & Biernat, 2010). For example, I argue invisibility is evident in perceivers’ treatment of Black women as interchangeable and indistinguishable, such that their individual voices and faces go unnoticed and unheard compared to their more prototypical counterparts (Sesko & Biernat, 2010). In my most recent line of work, I focus on the relative invisibility of American Indians and Alaska Natives that occurs when a group representation is outdated or erroneous. Specifically, I examine how historical representations within what I call “cultural tourism” (or the selling and/or commodification of culture) lead to the downgrading of Alaska Natives’ engagement in intelligent and contemporary related behaviors, but also to a reduction in use of negative “contemporary” stereotypes (vs. “historically placed” negative stereotypes).

Other lines of research include investigating 1) evidentiary standards of judgments of racism (e.g., how much and what kind of evidence is required to diagnose racism in different groups), 2) evidentiary standards for workplace performance criteria based on group membership—Black/White men/women, Alaska Native women/men), 3) the language people use to talk about members of stereotyped groups, and interpreters’ translation of this language (Biernat & Sesko, 2013b;  Biernat, Villicana, Sesko, & Zhao, under review), 4) social judgment and behavioral indicators of compensatory stereotyping, or tradeoffs between “warmth” and “competence” in evaluations of members of stereotyped groups (e.g., Biernat, Sesko, & Amo, 2009), and 5) how experiences of being powerful (or powerless) affect behavioral inclinations towards, and perceptions of, sexual harassment among police officers. All of these areas reflect my interest in understanding the processes by which stereotypes guide judgment and behavior toward individual members of stereotyped groups. I have additional interests in the study of close relationships, and have examined the role of attachment style on lying and authenticity in relationships (Gillath, Sesko, Shaver, & Chen, 2010) as well as relationship-related regrets (Schoemann, Gillath, & Sesko, 2012). I am also a member of the Center for Policing Equity (CPE; http://cpe.psych.ucla.edu/), a group that brings together police chiefs and social scientists to discuss how social science can inform real-world problems of racial profiling, immigration, and organizational equity.


Curriculum Vitae (PDF)

Glenn D. Wright

Assistant Professor of Political Science, USUAS-JC Advisor

Phone: 796-6115Fax: 796-6406

Email:

Lora E Vess

Assistant Professor of Social Sciences

Phone: 796-6152Fax: 796-6406

Email:

Ann Spehar

Assistant Professor of Economics

Phone: 228-4559Fax: 225-3624

Email:

Arts and Sciences Department

Paul Bldg, Room 506, Ketchikan Campus

Ketchikan Campus

Education

Ann Spehar earned a Masters in Applied Economics at Seattle University in Washington State where she also earned two undergraduate degrees in economics and math at the University of Washington. She holds a Master in Education in curriculum and instruction from Montana State University and has two years of study toward a doctorate degree in economics at Washington State University and the University of Calgary in Alberta, Canada.

Publications


Courses Taught

Ann Spehar is currently an Assistant Professor in Economics at the University of Alaska Southeast. She is responsible for designing, developing and instructing online asynchronous courses in Money and Banking, International Economics, Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory, and principles courses.

Other

Spehar’s field of interest is the theory of the endogenous business cycles. She has studied the 1930’s U.S. ‘Great Depression’ extensively, and has compared it to the 2008 financial crisis. Spehar has recently published two papers on that topic in the World Economics Journal.   She has also published in the International Journal of Wilderness International Journal of Wilderness.

Spehar has also worked as a consultant in industry, with areas of expertise in mathematical modeling, software engineering and project management. She worked 15 years at the Boeing Company, supporting clients that included Bell Laboratories, AT&T Long Lines, McDonnell Douglas and Hanford Nuclear Facility. She served in executive leadership at the Boeing Company in Seattle and received over 700 hours of Boeing Company training when that company was expanding its territory beyond aviation into computer timesharing services to the world. At the time, Boeing Computer Services (BCS) provided cutting edge computer engineering consultation to 148 government and commercial customers.

Ann Spehar was born in Fairbanks, Alaska “before it was a state” where her father served as editor of the Fairbanks Daily News Minor and headed up AP for Alaska.  She has recently moved from Montana with her husband Alex and Australian Shepherd Montana.

Brandon M Chapman

Assistant Professor of Anthropology

Phone: 228-4562

Email:

Arts and Sciences - Social Sciences

Ketchikan Campus

Education

Ph.D., Washington State University
M.S.S., Utah State University
B.A., DePauw University

Biography

Brandon Chapman is a cultural anthropologist specializing in local and traditional ecological knowledge, subsistence economies, and economic and cognitive anthropology. Since 2011, he has worked documenting the local knowledge of Native Alaskans across the state, mostly with the Iñupiaq of the Northwest Arctic. During this time, he designed and conducted the semi-structured interview methods for the Northwest Arctic Borough’s $1.8 million subsistence mapping project, which recorded highly and traditionally used subsistence areas across the region. Before moving to Alaska, Chapman worked on his dissertation in a small fishing village in Trinidad/Tobago where he showed that cognitive models shape how local subsistence users make decisions about economic transactions. He also conducted research in fishing villages in Peru for his master’s thesis. He has been published in several journals and popular science magazines including The Social Science Journal and Cultural Survival Quarterly. His research interests include local and traditional knowledge, subsistence management practices, and integrating cultural models into international and community development projects.

Chapman has also authored several monographs and publications on the history of ranching in the western U.S. and Canada during the 19th and 20th centuries. His research focuses on the Grant-Kohrs Ranch in Deer Lodge, MT and George Lane’s Bar U Ranch near Longview, AB. He received a Montana Historical Society Fellowship and has been invited to write for Montana: The Magazine of Western History.

Alison Ziegler

Assistant Professor of Psychology

Phone: 228-4563

Email:

Psychology

Paul Bldg, room 508, Ketchikan Campus

Ketchikan Campus

Education

B.A., M.S., Ph.D. University of Michigan

 
 

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