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1. Introduction

Welcome to the joys and challenges of teaching composition at UAS! Our goal is to provide opportunities for students to develop competency in integrated writing, critical thinking, reading, and speaking skills. As a composition instructor, you have an important role to play in helping students develop these skills. These guidelines are designed to provide information about the Composition Program. We hope you will find it helpful as you prepare and deliver your courses this semester. 
All composition courses must incorporate a substantial reading component. This might include an anthology of essays, selection of photocopied articles, books, or other reading materials. Student essays may be included in this reading requirement, but more challenging published readings should be the focus. Remedial courses include English 092 and Humanities 105: Critical Reading in the Humanities to further strengthen their reading skills. Students testing into English 092 are required to enroll in Humanities 105 unless their reading placement test suggests otherwise.

Faculty new to teaching composition at UAS will be assigned a mentor within the first week or two of the semester.  If at all possible, new adjuncts teaching composition will be encouraged to attend relevant meetings at Fall Convocation, held this year on August 21-22 at the Juneau campus. Adjunct faculty teaching English are valued members of our department, some of them having taught for many years at UAS.  They range from ranked professors who are ABD, to former UAS students of English who have gone on to do graduate work at other institutions.

Affirmed minimum qualifications for an adjunct faculty member teaching lower-level composition are that he or she have a bachelor's degree with an English emphasis (if not a full-fledged B.A. in English) and be in a graduate program studying English.  Implementation of this policy will make it possible to employ UAS graduates who have considerable experience as interns, tutors, and/or T.A.'s in the English program as instructors of online composition classes, so long as they are being mentored by the Director of Writing and are certified as having been accepted into a graduate degree program in English.

Student purchase of a grammar and style handbook is recommended in English 092, 110, and 111. An example is Diana Hacker’s A Writer’s Reference, currently in the 7th edition.

Laptop computers are available for use in all Egan classrooms and may be reserved by contacting the Computer Help Desk (796-6400) or Diana Collins (796-6116).  WB102, a classroom that already has PC computers may be requested for use during the semester.  Contact the Dept. of Humanities Administrative Assistant (796-6405) for classroom changes or reservations.

2. Faculty Support

Professor Nina Chordas is Chair of Humanities and Professor Rod Landis and Professor Emily Wall are Co-Directors of Composition and Assessment.

The following faculty and staff members are also available to assist composition faculty:  

  • Regional Instructional Designer (i.e., blackboard) Maureen O'Halloran:  (907) 747-7725
  • Computer Help Desk (E-mail, and UAS Online): (907) 796-6400.  
  • Egan Library Instructional Support: Elise Tomlinson, (907) 796-6440.
  • General Assistance UAS campus (including room scheduling, copier access, and book orders): Dept. of Humanities  Administrative Assistant (907) 796-6405.
  • Disabled or Learning Disabled Students: Margie Thomson, (907) 796-6465.
  • Problem Students: Professor Nina Chordas (907) 796-6407 or Joe Nelson (907) 796-6057
  • Roberta Stell Learning and Testing Center: Hildegard Sellner (907) 796-6348.
  • Composition Program Information and Student Challenges: Professor Rod Landis (907) 228-4547 or Professor Emily Wall (907)  796-6113.

3. Lower-division Course Descriptions and Guidelines

English 092: Improving Writing Skills (4 credits - Juneau, Sitka and Ketchikan)
Catalog Description:
Students will study writing as a process of composing and as a rhetorical act of communication. Review of basic grammar, mechanics, and usage will receive special attention. Students will write numerous short essays, which will be submitted in a portfolio for assessment.  Reading strategies will be discussed and students will be encouraged to read interactively. Prerequisite: English placement test. 

Course Guidelines

  • Students will write a diagnostic essay, preferably on the first day of class (Juneau campus only). After reviewing diagnostic essays and consulting with colleagues, faculty members may recommend that students enroll in higher level courses.
  • Students will write a minimum of 3,000 words. This will include at least three 2- to 3-page essays that are revised with input from the instructor.
  • Instructors will provide students with guidance and practice at all stages of the writing process: prewriting, drafting, and editing. Students will be introduced to the principles of grammar, punctuation, and syntax. However, the emphasis of the course will be on applying these “rules” within the context of the writing process. A grammar handbook is suggested.
  • Instructors will provide students with regular, constructive feedback on their work by scheduling individual and small group conferences, writing comments on drafts of papers and/or leading structured peer response workshops. (Note: One week of class time may be canceled to accommodate instructor-student conferences.)
  • Instructors will encourage students to work with tutors in the Learning Center.
  • Students will be required to read frequently in order to enhance their ability to think critically and develop ideas for essays. A reading anthology or other substantial reading component will be required.
  • Students will reflect on their own writing in reflective essays, learning logs, process journals, and/or portfolio cover letters.
  • Students will practice speaking and listening in class discussions, presentations, and/or small-group activities.

English 110: Introduction to College Writing (4 credits)
Catalog Description: This course focuses on the basics of writing, including control of basic grammar and punctuation. Through frequent writing and revision, students develop a portfolio of essays that is submitted to a review panel for assessment at mid-term and at the end of the semester. The course does not satisfy the GER communication requirement. May be repeated once for credit but is applicable for degree credit only once. Prerequisite: English Placement Test or “C” or higher in 092.

Course Guidelines

  • Students will write a diagnostic essay, preferably on the first day of class (Juneau campus only). After reviewing diagnostic essays and both writing and reading placement tests as well as consulting with colleagues, faculty members may recommend that students enroll in higher or lower level courses.
  • Students will write a minimum of 2,500 words. This will include at least three 3- to 4-page essays that are revised with input from the instructor. (Note: Instructors are advised to limit their comments to only two drafts of each essay assigned.) When writing these essays, students will employ a variety of organizational strategies. An analytical essay (e.g., extended reading response, book review, or literary analysis) is required; however, this particular essay should be addressed in the second half of the semester.
  • Instructors will provide students with guidance and practice at all stages of the writing process: prewriting, drafting, and editing. Students will review the principles of grammar, punctuation, and syntax. However, the emphasis of the course will be on applying these “rules” within the context of the writing process. A grammar handbook is suggested.
  • Instructors will provide students with regular, constructive feedback on their work by scheduling individual and small group conferences, writing comments on drafts of papers and/or leading structured peer response workshops. (Note: One week of class time may be canceled to accommodate instructor-student conferences.)
  • Instructors will encourage students to work with tutors in the Learning Center.
  • Students will be required to read frequently in order to enhance their ability to think critically and develop ideas for essays. A reading anthology or other substantial reading component will be required.
  • Students will learn to reflect on their own writing by composing two 350-word in-class essays that will serve as cover letters for their mid-term and final portfolios.
  • Students will complete a range of short writing assignments such as reading response papers, reading journals, in-class writing, peer commentaries, or discussion board postings.
  • Students will practice speaking and listening in class discussions, presentations, and/or small-group activities.

English 111: Methods of Written Communication (3 credits) 
Catalog Description: Instruction on techniques of essay organization and development, research, and analytical reading and writing. A critical analysis and a research paper are required. Prerequisite: “C” or higher in English 110 or placement test.

Course Guidelines

  • Students will write a diagnostic essay, preferably on the first day of class (Juneau campus only). After reviewing diagnostic essays and consulting with colleagues, faculty members may recommend that students enroll in higher or lower level courses.
  • Students will write a minimum of 4,000 words. This will include at least three 4- to 5-page essays that are revised with input from the instructor. When writing these essays, students will employ a variety of organizational strategies. An academic research paper and an analytical essay (e.g., reading response paper or literary analysis) are required. One paper may be a personal descriptive/narrative essay that is tied to text reading.
  • The research paper must be 6 to 8 pages (1,500-2,000 words) long and make reference to a minimum of 3 outside sources. Instructors must provide written feedback on a draft of the research paper. Students will learn practical research skills by participating in a library tour and/or introduction to virtual library resources. Instructors will provide instruction in research writing techniques and the MLA system of documentation. Instructors will give special attention to methods of analyzing the suitability of sources, integrating source material, and avoiding plagiarism.
  • The analytical paper should critically analyze a film, essay, poem, or other work. The student may analyze his or her reaction to some part of the work’s content, address matters of logic, offer counter-arguments, or draw from personal experience and/or other text readings.
    Only one literary analysis paper (i.e., an essay that analyzes literary technique in a work of poetry, fiction, or drama) may be required.
  • Instructors will provide students with guidance and practice at all stages of the writing process: prewriting, drafting, and editing. The course will not provide a formal review of grammar, punctuation, and syntax. However, instructors will address editing issues as needed. A grammar handbook is suggested.
  • Instructors will provide students with regular, constructive feedback on their work by scheduling individual and small group conferences, writing comments on drafts of papers and/or leading structured peer response workshops. (Note: One week of class time may be canceled to accommodate instructor-student conferences.)
  • Instructors will encourage students to work with tutors in the Learning Center.
  • Students will be required to read frequently in order to enhance their ability to think critically and develop ideas for essays. A reading anthology or other substantial reading component will be required (e.g., student essays, photocopied articles, books). The readings for the course should be more complex than those required in English 110 and should introduce students to diverse perspectives.
  • Students will complete a range of short writing assignments such as reading response papers, reading journals, in-class writing, peer commentaries, discussion board postings, reflective essays, learning logs, process journals, and/or portfolio cover letters.
  • Students will practice speaking and listening in class discussions, presentations, and/or small-group activities.
  • Faculty in Juneau are encouraged to require students to attend performances of plays at Perseverance Theatre. A theatre schedule is available at http://perseverancetheatre.org/shows/juneau.html

English 211: Intermediate Composition: Writing About Literature (3 credits)
Catalog Description: This course focuses on understanding and appreciation literature, which will generate topics for analytical and persuasive essays. Students write analyses of at least three works from various genres (poetry, fiction, drama, non-fiction, and the novel or film). Traditional literary research among critical sources leads to at least one research paper. Students who complete English 211 will have a working knowledge of how to write an analysis of a particular text, using secondary sources to support and clarify their arguments. Prerequisite: “C” or higher in English 111.

Course Guidelines

  • During the first week, students will write a diagnostic essay that clarifies how they meet the prerequisite (“C” or higher in English 111) for English 211, including where, when, and with whom English 111 was taken and the final course grade for English 111.
  • Students will write a minimum of 5,000 words. This will include at least three 4- to 5-page analytical essays that are revised with student and instructor feedback. One of the essays may form the basis of the research paper.
  • The research paper should be 7 to 8 pages long and should make reference to 4 to 6 outside sources. Students will also be (re)introduced to techniques of research writing and the MLA system of documentation.
  • Instructors will provide students with guidance and practice at all stages of the writing process: prewriting, drafting, and editing. The course will not include a formal review of grammar, punctuation, and syntax; however, the instructors will address editing issues as needed.
  • Instructors will provide students with regular, constructive feedback on their writing; this may include writing comments on drafts of papers, leading structured peer response workshops, responding to journal entries, and scheduling student conferences. (Note: One week of class time may be canceled to accommodate instructor-student conferences.) Departmental policy indicates that instructors will only evaluate two drafts of each essay.
  • Instructors will introduce students to basic critical terminology necessary for understanding, appreciating, and writing about literature.
  • Instructors should encourage students to work with tutors in the Learning Center.
  • Students will be required to read a broad range of literature within a variety of genres and cultural perspectives.
  • Students will compose a range of short writing assignments: reading response papers, reading journals, in-class writing, peer commentaries, Online entries, reflective essays, learning logs, process journals, and/or portfolio cover letters.
  • Students will practice speaking and listening in class discussions, presentations, and/or small-group activities.
  • Faculty in Juneau are encouraged to require students to attend performances of plays at Perseverance Theatre. A theatre schedule is available at http://perseverancetheatre.org/shows/juneau.html

English 212: Technical Report Writing (3 credits) 
Catalog Description: Composition of business correspondence and formal and informal technical reports.  The student should be well versed in a technical field before enrolling.  Prerequisite:  "C" or higher in English 111.

Course Guidelines

  • Students will write a diagnostic essay, preferably on the first of day of class (Juneau campus only).  After reviewing diagnostic essays and consulting with colleagues, faculty members may recommend that students enroll in higher or lower level courses.
  • Students will write a minimum of 4,000 words. This will include at least three 4- to 5-page essays that are revised with instructor input. A technical analysis and a research paper are required.
  • The research paper should be 6 to 8 pages long and should make reference to 3 to 5 outside sources. Students will learn practical research skills by participating in a library tour.
  • Students will also be (re)introduced to research writing techniques and systems of documentation.
  • Instructors will provide students with guidance and practice at all stages of the writing process: prewriting, drafting, and editing. The course will not include a formal review of grammar, punctuation, and syntax; however, instructors will address editing issues as needed.
  • Instructors will provide students with regular, constructive feedback on their work by scheduling individual and small group conferences, writing comments on drafts of papers, and/or leading structured peer response workshops.
  • Instructors will introduce students to basic critical terminology necessary for communicating technical information.
  • Instructors should encourage students to work with tutors in The Learning Center.
  • Students will be required to read a variety of technical reports and documents.  A reading anthology or other substantial reading component is required
  • Students will reflect on their own writing in reflective essays, learning logs, process journals, and/or portfolio cover letters.
  • Students will compose a range of short writing assignments: such as reading response papers, reading journals, in-class writing, peer commentaries, or discussion board postings.
  • Students will practice speaking and listening in class discussions, presentations, and/or small-group activities.

        Note:  English 212 is not an acceptable pre-requisite for English 311.

4. Assessment Activities for English 110, 111 and 211.

All full-time and part-time faculty are encouraged to bring questions to Rod Landis, Co-Director of Composition, as needed throughout the semester. Each semester two portfolio reading sessions for 110 faculty will occur: one at mid-term and one at the end of the semester. The portfolio deadlines for the 2013-2014 academic year are as follows:

Fall 2013 Semester Mid-term Reading

  • Borderline Portfolio Due (faxed to or dropped at Carrie Enge's office in Room 204 of the Hendrickson Building): Thursday, October 17 by 12:00 noon.
  • Norming Session: Friday, October 18, 1:00-3:00 p.m.
  • Portfolio Reading and Wrap Up: Saturday, October 19, 9:00-1:00 p.m.

Fall 2013 Semester Final Reading

  • Borderline Portfolio Due (faxed to or dropped at Carrie Enge's office in Room 204 of the Hendrickson Building): Thursday, December 5 by 12:00 noon.
  • Norming Session: Friday, December 6, 1:00-3:00 p.m.
  • Portfolio Reading and Wrap Up: Saturday, December 7, 9:00-1:00 p.m.

Spring 2014 Semester Mid-term Reading

  • Borderline Portfolio Due (faxed to or dropped at Carrie Enge's office in Room 204 of the Hendrickson Building): Thursday, February 27 by 12:00 noon.
  • Norming Session: Friday, February 28, 1:00-3:00 p.m.
  • Portfolio Reading and Wrap-up: Saturday, March 1, 9:00-1:00 p.m.

Spring 2014 Semester Final Reading

  • Borderline Portfolio Due (faxed to or dropped at Carrie Enge's office in Room 204 of the Hendrickson Building): Thursday, April 24 by 12:00 noon.
  • Norming Session: Friday, April 25, 1:00-3:00 p.m.
  • Portfolio Reading and Wrap-up: Saturday, April 26, 9:00-1:00 p.m.

Details of the portfolio process are published in a handout which is distributed to all English 110 faculty and students each semester. As part of the portfolio review process, faculty are required to contribute to a two-hour norming activity, a half-day portfolio reading session, and a one-hour wrap up discussion. Adjunct faculty participants will be given a .5 workload credit above the credits for the course. Faculty teaching more than one section of English 110 will receive no more than .5 credit overload per semester. English 110 faculty are eligible for an additional .5 credit overload when they devote a minimum of 30 hours over the course of the semester to tutoring (primarily English 110 students) in the Learning Center. The hours for this work must be regularly scheduled on a weekly basis.

Assessment Activities for English 111
All full-time and part-time faculty are encouraged to bring questions to Professor Emily Wall, Co-Director of Composition. 

Assessment Activities for English 211
All full-time and part-time faculty are encouraged to bring questions to Professor Rod Landis, Co-Director of Composition, as needed throughout the year.

5. Placement Testing

Upon admission to the university, each student is required to take an Accuplacer placement test, including a writing exam that features a short essay, in the Roberta Stell Learning Center. This exam is evaluated by the Roberta Stell Learning and Testing Center staff members, who place students in composition courses according to their level of writing ability. On the first day of class, composition faculty on the Juneau campus should require students to write a 30- to 40-minute diagnostic essay to make sure that students have been placed appropriately. After reviewing writing samples and consulting with colleagues, faculty members may recommend that students enroll in higher or lower level courses. Students are not permitted to appeal the results of the writing placement exam.  Students may elect to re-take the writing placement exam after one year has passed.

 

6. Course Challenges

No classes in our department may be challenged for credit through departmental examinations. Applications for waivers to some required courses will be considered. When granted, waivers are never for credit. Courses in humanities regularly coming under this category are Communication 111 and foreign language courses. For COMM 111, a take-home examination, oral interview, and public presentation are required. English 211 and 212 cannot be challenged or waived.

UAS accepts credit and/or waiver for English 111 based on several national standardized tests. The UAS Communications faculty have established the following policies for such test-score acceptance:

  • Students who receive 500 or higher on the CLEP subject test in English composition with essay will receive credit for English 111. CLEP exams are not available for English 211, English 212, or any other English courses.
  • If students receive an English/verbal score of 30+ on the ACT OR 620+ on the SAT, English 111 is waived. Scores more than two years old are not applicable. Students will not receive credit for English 111 based on ACT or SAT scores.

English 110 Challenge
With instructor permission, English 092 students may challenge English 110 by preparing a writing portfolio to be presented to the English 110 portfolio review panel. The student must submit a mid-term and final portfolio that follows the guidelines set out for the English 110 portfolio review. If two objective portfolio readers agree that the portfolio demonstrates English 110 competence, the student will be permitted to enroll in English 111 the following semester.

English 111 Challenge

With instructor permission, English 110 students may challenge English 111 by preparing a writing portfolio to be presented to the English 110 portfolio review panel. This portfolio must include

  • An in-class cover letter of at least 350 words that addresses how the portfolio demonstrates English 111 competency (as described in the English 111 guidelines above).
  • A minimum of 4,000 words of writing (excluding the cover letter). This includes a starred essay with a range of drafts attached, an analytical essay, and a 6- to 8-page research paper with a minimum of 3 sources. Students may use a research paper from another course if it is one in which they are currently enrolled. All papers in the Challenge Portfolio must demonstrate writing at the English 111 level.

Each English 111 challenge portfolio will be read by two readers (neither of whom is the student’s instructor). If portfolio readers agree that the portfolio demonstrates English 111 competency, the student will receive credit for English 111 (rather than 110) and will be permitted to enroll in English 211 (or English 212) the following semester.

7. Syllabus Guidelines

Each semester faculty are required to upload their composition syllabus online at the course website.   If you need assistance in uploading the syllabus, you can either contact the helpdesk at 796-6400 or the administrative assistant at 796-6405.  Each syllabus must include the following information:

• Course number, title, and location
• Instructor’s name and contact information
• Course description and texts
• Information about how the course will fulfill UAS learning competencies
• Grading criteria
• Attendance, late work, and plagiarism policies
• A schedule of assignments.  On English 110 syllabi, please clearly state the following policy: "If students receive a 'D' or lower in English 110, they will not be permitted to enroll in English 111, regardless of whether or not they have passed the portfolio review. Therefore, they must not only concentrate on passing the English 110 portfolio requirement but also on fulfilling other course requirements as outlined on the course syllabus."

8. Attendance Policy

According to Humanities Department policy, students who miss more than three weeks of class will automatically fail the course. Individual faculty members may choose to adhere to a stricter attendance policy or to grade students down for late work and tardiness. The attendance policy for each course must be stated clearly on the syllabus.

9. Plagiarism

Make sure your syllabus outlines the consequences of plagiarism. The discovery of a case of intentional plagiarism normally results in the student receiving a failing grade for the paper and/or course. In order to accuse students of plagiarism, instructors must have documentary proof that plagiarism has occurred. In questionable cases, contact Rod Landis, Co-Director of Composition. Instructors can prevent students from plagiarizing by requiring students to revise their essays in multiple drafts and by requiring them to submit photocopies of sources with research papers. It is also important that instructors teach correct methods of paraphrasing, and consider formulating assignments so that they are not generic enough to be plagiarized easily.

In addition, students cannot submit written work to more than one instructor, for more than one class, without express permission from the current instructor.  This practice is considered a violation of academic honesty, and students should be made aware that "double-dipping" in this manner is a serious offense.

10. Instructional Technology

Composition faculty members are encouraged to integrate computer technology into course assignments. This may include integrating a UAS Forum or Discussion Board exchange into your course. Home pages for all composition courses are set up automatically by the computing staff on UAS Online every semester. Instructors are encouraged to tailor their web pages by posting syllabi and other information on their UAS Online course pages. The Help Desk is available for individualized instruction on integrating technology into course assignments (907-796-6400). Diana Collins, Instructional Facilities Supervisor, provides seminars for small groups of students on a wide range of computing skills. Call her for a schedule of topics (907-796-6116).

11. Dual Enrollment and Underage Students

UAS is one of many universities nationally that allow dual enrollment for able high school and middle school students. These students are usually motivated and ready for the challenge of college work. You may encounter some of these students in your composition classes. In the past, these students have done exceptionally well and have added to the class experience for their peers. However, if you encounter difficulties with underage students or have any other questions, please contact Professor Nina Chordas, Department Chair, (907) 796-6407, or Professor Rod Landis, Co-Director of Composition, (907) 228-4547.

12. Substitute Instructors

If instructors know in advance that they will be absent from class (because of conference travel, etc.), they should arrange for a substitute instructor and inform the Department Chair of the absence.

13. Faculty Initiated Withdrawal

If students stop attending class, faculty members have the option of withdrawing them from the course using an add/drop form. Faculty may initiate this withdrawal through the first twelve weeks of a regular semester; however, faculty are not obligated to initiate such a withdrawal.

14. Evaluation Rubric

An “A” paper is excellent in overall quality.

  • The thesis is clearly stated. It makes a point that is thought provoking and reflects critical thinking.
  • The organization is clear, efficient, focused, and engaging.
  • Topic sentences and transitions are used effectively to introduce and link body paragraphs.
  • Examples, quotes, images, or other specific details are used effectively as support for the essay’s thesis and topic sentences.
  • Language is precise, appropriate, fresh, and vivid.
  • Sentence structure is economical, varied, and elegant.
  • There are virtually no errors in proofreading, grammar, punctuation, and syntax.

A “B” paper is good in overall quality.

  • The thesis is clearly stated, but it may lack the originality or critical thinking of the thesis in the “A” paper.
  • The organization is for the most part clear and focused. The paper may demonstrate some minor breaks in focus or some looseness in structure.
  • Topic sentences and transitions are for the most part used effectively to introduce and link body paragraphs. There may be occasional problems with essay coherence but not enough to distract the reader significantly.
  • Examples, quotes, images, or other specific details are used as support for the essay’s thesis and topic sentences. However, the thesis is not developed as fully or effectively as in the “A” paper.
  • Language is for the most part precise and appropriate.
  • Sentence structure is for the most part economical and varied.
  • There are some minor errors in proofreading, grammar, punctuation, and syntax. However, these errors do not significantly distract the reader.

A “C” paper is competent in overall quality.

  • The thesis is adequately stated.
  • An organizational scheme is present but is somewhat sketchy and/or hard to follow.
  • Topic sentences are sometimes inadequate and transitions between paragraphs are abrupt.
  • Examples, quotes, images, or other specific details are used but only to a minimal extent.
  • Paragraphs are sometimes choppy and underdeveloped.
  • Language is sometimes wordy, vague, unoriginal, and repetitive.
  • Sentence structure is sometimes repetitive or hard to follow.
  • There are errors in proofreading, grammar, punctuation, and syntax. These errors are somewhat distracting but they do not obscure the essay’s meaning.

A “No Pass” paper is inadequate in overall quality. Substantial weaknesses in any of the following areas are sufficient justification for a “No Pass” grade.

  • The thesis is unclear.
  • An organizational scheme is hard to follow.
  • Topic sentences are inadequate and transitions between paragraphs are absent.
  • Examples, quotes, images, or other specific details are not used to support the thesis.
  • Paragraphs are choppy and underdeveloped.
  • Language is wordy, vague, unoriginal, and repetitive.
  • Sentence structure is repetitive and hard to follow.
  • There are errors in proofreading, grammar, punctuation, and syntax. These errors distract the reader to such an extent that the essay’s meaning is obscured.

15. Upper-Division Writing Courses

English S261 Introduction to Creative Writing (3 credits)
Catalog Description: Introduction to the study and practice of writing original works of fiction and poetry. Writing techniques are explored through class discussion, study of established writers, and participation in writing workshops. Prerequisite: ENGL S211 (C or higher) or instructor permission.

English 311: Advanced Composition (3 credits)
Catalog Description: The study of literary non-fiction writing in its various forms, moving beyond traditional academic writing.
Genres studied may include cultural criticism, literary journalism, book reviews, feature articles, radio pieces, personal essays, blog writing, and travel writing. Critical analysis of published essays is a primary feature. Advanced rhetoric techniques, creative structures, research, and the writer/audience relationship are studied.  Students share work and engage in critical analysis and editing. Prerequisite: ENGL S211 (C or higher) and upper division standing, or instructor permission.  Prerequisite: Upper division standing with a “C” or higher in English 211 or instructor permission. 

English 414: Research Writing (3 credits)
Catalog Description: The study of literary non-fiction writing in its various forms, moving beyond traditional academic writing. Genres studied may include cultural criticism, literary journalism, book reviews, feature articles, radio pieces, personal essays, blog writing, and travel writing. Critical analysis of published essays is a primary feature. Advanced rhetoric techniques, creative structures, research, and the writer/audience relationship are studied.  Students share work and engage in critical analysis and editing. Prerequisite: ENGL S211 (C or higher) and upper division standing, or instructor permission.

English S461 Advanced Creative Writing: Selected Topics (3 credits) 
Catalog Description: Advanced study and practice in the techniques of creative writing. This may include poetry, drama, fiction, creative non-fiction, or other genres. Creative writing techniques are explored through literary study and writing workshops. The specific theme and/or genre will be announced in the course schedule. May be repeated for credit when content varies. Prerequisite: ENGL S261 (C or higher) and upper-division standing, or instructor permission.
 
 

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