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Martin Article Re-published in AirCare Repair Newsletter

A new day has dawned for the diesel engine. Once known as a dirty technology, diesels are breaking free from their old reputation.

A bi-annual publication of the AirCare vehicle emissions control program in British Columbia, Canada has re-published an article by Associate Professor of Automotive Technology Tony Martin on cleaner burning diesel  engines. The newsletter goes out to automotive technicians throughout B.C.'s lower mainland that are participating in the AirCare program.

Here is an excerpt of the article, Urea SCR Service
This new technology keeps improving diesel emissions.
By Tony Martin. Reprinted with Permission. 

A new day has dawned for the diesel engine. Once known as a dirty technology, diesels are breaking free from their old reputation. Diesel emission regulations have continued to tighten over the past 20 years, and diesels now are held to the same standard as gasoline engines. Cleaner fuels have played a role in the cleanup effort, but the diesel engine itself has been transformed and has come a long way from where it was even just five years ago. These refinements in design have changed the customer’s driving experience but also impacted the way we go about things in our service bays.

The extensive article is four and half pages including photos. The entire article can be read at the Repairnet.aircare.ca Website.

Article PhotoThe 2011 Chevrolet Silverado pickup equipped with the 6.6 liter Duramax diesel uses selective catalytic reduction (SCR) as part of its emission control strategy. Note the blue DEF fill cap near the firewall. (Photo: General Motors)

 
 

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