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04-18-2014
Significant genetic differences among all locations, with Southeast Alaska particularly divergent from the others.
Jennifer Stoutamore, University of Alaska Fairbanks fisheries graduate student, and her advisor, University of Alaska Southeast biology faculty Dr. David Tallmon have identified a genetic population and mating structure for blue king crab in Alaska and Russian waters. The project was funded by Alaska Sea Grant.  Stoutamore and Tallmon first worked with researchers at the Savannah River Ecology Lab to develop genetic markers specific to blue king crab. Using the markers, they compared the genetics of blue king crab for eight locations in Alaska (Southeast Alaska, Pribilof Islands, St. Matthew Island, Little Diomede) and Russia (Chaunskaya Bay, western Bering Sea, and two sites in the Sea of Okhotsk). They found significant genetic differences among all locations, with Southeast Alaska particularly divergent from the others. Identifying genetically distinct populations is useful to fishery management and recovery efforts. For example, an understanding of the size and location of distinct populations is critical for identifying harvest units and assessing potential consequences of stock enhancement. Read the full story at FISHupdate.com.
 
 

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