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Facilities Services Survey

On average this survey should take 10 minutes to complete, yet your answers can make a world of difference as we look to improve.

W. Keith Gerken, Director, Facilities Services

As a part of our ongoing efforts to improve service, we are soliciting feedback regarding campus condition, your general satisfaction with our services, and our work order process and performance. Our goal is to provide high quality space and deliver timely, quality, and cost effective services in order to support your endeavors. Your answers to these questions will be invaluable in helping us improve our department’s response to your needs. On average this survey should take 10 minutes to complete, yet your answers can make a world of difference as we look to improve.

Please click here to begin: https://uasfacilitiessurvey15.questionpro.com

Thank you for your help and for taking the time to share your thoughts and impressions.

W. Keith Gerken
Director
Facilities Services

UAS Emergency Preparedness – Know What to

ALICE - A (alert) L (lockdown) I (inform) C (counter) E (evacuate)

UAS is presenting an ALICE -  A (alert) L (lockdown) I (inform) C (counter) E (evacuate) -  active shooter training on November 6 from 12:00-1:30pm.

The training will be facilitated by City & Borough of Juneau Emergency Preparedness Coordinator Tom Mattice and Juneau Police Department Lt. David Campbell, and will feature a screening on active shooter scenarios “Shots Fired.”  Employees who cannot make the training are strongly encourage to see the video, now hosted on the UAS server. It can be see here: http://uas.alaska.edu/pub/safetyvideos

Location:  Glacier View Room in person, or Audio Conference: 800-832-7806, PIN 3939856

This training is recommended, but not mandatory.  We are thankful for the willingness of CBJ and JPD to provide this training to our campus community.

NOTES: The Ketchikan campus will hold building meetings in November to review emergency and safety procedures for each building. Watch for notification of days and times.

When calling in an emergency from a campus phone, always dial 8-911.

Free Ice Grippers to Staff and Faculty

It's that time of year!

Dan Garcia, Health and Safety Manager

Snow is working its way down the mountains.  It’s that time of year when we need to take extra precautions while walking.  Ice Grippers are available free to UAS employees and faculty.  Now would be a good time to take a look around and see if you can locate your ice grippers from previous years.  If you find them, look them over to make sure they are serviceable.  Check that the rubber is intact and you are not missing any spikes.    

If you need a new pair, please do the following and I will send you a new pair through interoffice mail:

Send an e-mail to me at:  djgarcia@uas.alaska.edu

Please make sure you tell me your Boot Size and your Mailstop

A few winter walking tips:

  • Wear sensible winter shoes with good traction
  • Give yourself extra time to drive and walk to your destination
  • Do not walk with your hands in your pockets or your arms loaded
  • Keep your eyes on the path in front of you, watch for black ice
  • Shuffle your feet so you are evenly shifting your weight
  • Use hand rails where available
  • If the path has been cleared, look for ice melt to walk on

*If you have a good winter walking suggestion, send it to me when you request your ice grippers !

Thanks and stay on your feet out there!

Dan Garcia

UAS Health and Safety Manager

796-6077

Alaska EPSCoR to host Data Visualization Workshop

Alaska EPSCoR will be hosting a Visualization Workshop on the UAF campus on November 16-17.



2016 URECA Award application for funding is now available!

Attention All UAS Undergraduate Students

UAS is excited to announce that this year’s Undergraduate REsearch and Creative Activity (URECA) application period is now open. If you have a research or creative project that you would like to undertake, please consider applying for funding through URECA. We can offer up to $2,500 to selected students who design and complete their own projects with the guidance of a faculty mentor. See the URECA website for more details.

“Every Voice Matters: Recording and Sharing Alaska Native Educational Experiences”

The theme for this oral history project is “Every Voice Matters: Recording and Sharing Alaska Native Educational Experiences.”

Beth Weigel, Ph.D., Adjunct Professor, Communication and Program Coordinator, Juneau Public Libraries

In addition to teaching the Introduction to Communication course at UAS as an Adjunct, I am also the program coordinator for the Juneau Public Libraries. Recently, we were awarded a StoryCorps @ Your Library grant which is funded by the American Library Association and StoryCorps, a national oral history project whose mission it is to provide people of all backgrounds and beliefs with the opportunity to record, share and, preserve the stories of our lives. The theme for this oral history project is “Every Voice Matters: Recording and Sharing Alaska Native Educational Experiences.”

Working in partnership with the Egan Library and faculty member Lance Twitchell, as well as a host of other community partners, we would like to invite you and your students to participate in this unique community project. Participants receive a free CD recording of their interview and can choose to archive their story with the Juneau Public Libraries, StoryCorps, and the American Folklife Center at the Library of Congress. Additionally, we are working to add Sealaska Heritage Institute and the Cyril George Alaska native Knowledge Collection at UAS as archive partners.

Our goal is to be a catalyst for civic engagement about education and to create an archive of stories that reflects that conversation. It has been an honor to be present as elders and their family members share their stories – some, painful memories of systematic erasure of their language and culture by historical institutions, and others, emerging new approaches to learning that strive to be inclusive of Alaska Native ways of knowing. We also hope the opportunity to participate in this conversation enhances other activities on campus like the “Native Voices: Native Peoples’ Concepts of Health and Illness” exhibit and the “One Campus, One Book” selection of Ernestine Hayes’ book, Blonde Indian.

We’ll be using the recording studio this semester, which is located on the ground floor of the Egan Library, and can schedule interviews between friends, co-workers, or family members on Tuesdays and Thursdays between 10am and 1pm. Other times and locations can be arranged as well. Please contact me at this email Beth.Weigel@juneau.org or by phone 907-586-0434 to make an appointment. Generally it takes anywhere from an hour to an hour and half to fill out the paperwork, record the interview, and sign the release forms.

Awards

Haye's memoir named first statewide "read"

This year’s One Campus One Book author, Ernestine Hayes, now has an added honor.

This year’s One Campus One Book author, Ernestine Hayes, now has an added honor.

This year’s One Campus One Book now has an added honor. English faculty Ernestine Hayes' American Book Award winning memoir Blonde Indian has been named the first statewide “read” by the Alaska Center for the Book. In an October 10 announcement, Alaska Writer Laureate Frank Soos called it, “a book of rich thematic and structural complexity, a book that will invite consideration of emotional, psychological and moral questions, and a book of great beauty as well.” Between October and February of 2016, Alaskans will be reading Blonde Indian and talking about it. Libraries will have copies of the book and bookstores will have it on their shelves. Blonde Indian is available as an e-book as well.

Friday, November 6 at 7 p.m., Hayes will read and discuss her book and explore the prevalence of the animistic worldview of Tlingit being at the Evening at Egan presentation in the Egan Library.

Events

UAS Indigenous Day Community Dialogue

SAT. November 7, Egan Library 12 noon

Columbus Day is a federally recognized holiday, which is problematic because of a documented violent history with indigenous people in the Americas. UAS students have voted to recognize Indigenous Peoples’ Day on the day that Columbus Day is typically recognized, in hopes to initiate conversations on decolonization and healing. The Egan Library hosted a box to collect ideas October 12, 2015 to October 16, 2015. Wooch.een will read the collected anonymous responses and publicly discuss on November 7th at an open community dialogue in the Egan Library, 12-3PM. For more information please contact the Native and Rural Student Center at 907-796-6043, or email uas_jywe@uas.alaska.edu

Juneau Campus Halloween 2015

Halloween fun!

Halloween fun!

Additional UAS One Campus One Book 2015 Fall Events

"Blonde Indian" events include Workshop and Book Group





UAS at Thunder Mountain High School College and Career Fair

UAS attends the Thunder Mountain High School College Fair.

UAS attends the Thunder Mountain High School College Fair.

The Making of “Never Alone”: Native Voices and New Media Display

November 4, UAS Recreation Center, 7 p.m.

“Never Alone” is the first game developed in collaboration with the Iñupiat, an Alaska Native people. A panel of contributors will showcase the game and discuss how new media platforms like video games can be used to tell traditional stories, celebrate indigenous language, contribute to decolonization efforts and share a vibrant, in-tact culture with younger generations. The event will feature multi-media content from the video game. Moderated by Ernestine Hayes and featuring Ishmael Hope, Amy Fredeen, Matt Swanson*, Ian Gil*, David Koenig* and Casey McDonnell*. *E-Line Media team participating via Skype. Checkout the game trailer available on YouTube.

UAS Sitka Represented at Statewide Academic Conference

Many staff and faculty represented the UAS Sitka Campus at the 2015 Alaska Math and Science Conference(AMSC).

The annual conference took place October 23- 25 in Sitka, Alaska. Several Sitka faculty served as speakers for breakout sessions.

Fisheries Technology professors Reid Brewer and Joel Markis led a session called College Fisheries Coursework Available on the iPad,which focused on the use of mobile technology in the classroom. Marine Biology professor Jan Straley, along with Sitka Sound Science Center manager Lisa Busch, discussed Sitka’s Scientists in the Schools program in the session Working Scientists into your Classroom. Math professor Joe Liddle also offered a session entitled Intro to Khan Academy, which explored the educational tool from both teacher and student perspectives.

Faculty and Alumni Share Knowledge at Clan Conference

2014 Humanities Outstanding Graduate Will Geiger presented his paper "De-colonial ethics in the work of Richard Dauenhauer" as part of a panel on the legacy of the late Alaska Native languages scholar and faculty member.

2014 Humanities Outstanding Graduate Will Geiger presented his paper "De-colonial ethics in the work of Richard Dauenhauer" as part of a panel on the legacy of the late Alaska Native languages scholar and faculty member.

UAS faculty were involved in planning, presentations and story collecting at the bi-annual “Sharing Our Knowledge: A Conference of Tlingit Tribes and Clans” October 28-31 at Centennial Hall in Juneau. The clan conference has been a gathering of elders and academics, tradition bearers and students since 1993 when it was initiated by the late Tlingit scholar Andrew Hope III. The 2015 conference had about 40 sessions ranged in topics from art to ecology. UAS presenters included Alaska Native Languages and Studies program head Lance Twitchell with “Creating a Tlingit Language Immersion School” and 2014 graduate Will Geiger on “De-colonial ethics in the work of Richard Dauenhauer.” Affiliate Assistant Professor of Alaska Native Languages Alice Taff was a conference organizer. Events included a weaving exhibit, a Native Arts market, and a chance to listen to Alaska Native educational stories through “StoryCorps @ your library.”

Adjunct Communications faculty and Juneau Public Library program coordinator Beth Weigel hosted a listening booth featuring excerpts from interviews recorded in Juneau, Haines and Klukwan. Conference attendees recorded their own stories alone or with a friend or family member. “It’s a great format for passing down stories through the generations and telling people about experiences that they’ve lived and they want to share and make sure that that voice stays alive, the sound of that voice as well as the stories from that person,” said Weigel.

News

Alaska Native Knowledge Grant Includes Dauenhauer Film Project

An initial cut of the film premiers at the final Evening at Egan of the 2015 series, Friday, November 20, 7 p.m. at the Juneau campus Egan Library.

UAS has collaborated with the Alaska Humanities Forum, Goldbelt Heritage Foundation, Kathy Ruddy (in memory of Bill Ruddy), and the Rasmuson Foundation to bring in $38,000 for a three-phase project to create central spaces for Alaska Native Languages & Alaska Native Knowledge on the Juneau campus and a film project documenting the lives of the late Richard and Nora Dauenhauer, who drove language revitalization, civil rights, and equal education efforts in Southeast Alaska.  In 2014, X̱ʼunei Lance Twitchell, Assistant Professor of Alaska Native Languages, applied for funding through the Alaska Humanities Forum to make the film.  The recent Rasmuson grant completes the funding.  The film project reflects upon the Dauehauer’s impact on the arts, education, and Alaska Native communities within Alaska. The film includes biography, history, poetry, Tlingit music, Tlingit language, and the landscape and politics of Alaska. Richard and Nora tell stories of their life and work, and share their personal archives. The final product is a “living history” that will be screened at an Alaska Native Film Series. An initial cut of the film premiers at the final Evening at Egan of the 2015 series, Friday, November 20, 7 p.m. at the Juneau campus Egan Library.

Chancellor's Comments-November 2015

UAS Chancellor Rick Caulfield

Chancellor Rick Caulfield addresses recruiting and retention at UAS.

Chancellor Rick Caulfield addresses recruiting and retention at UAS.

November 5, 2015

Dear UAS faculty and staff:

UAS is facing some significant recruitment and retention challenges, especially on our Juneau campus. In the period 2010-2014, overall student credit hour production at UAS fell 9.5 percent. This fall on the Juneau Campus, credit hours are down 10 percent compared with this time last year. The Sitka and Ketchikan campuses showed modest increases in credit hours, leading UAS overall to be down 3 percent compared to last year. Enrollments in programs offered largely online appear to be holding their own or even increasing modestly, but declines in campus-based programs are troubling.

We have an opportunity to change this, but all of us need to be involved. In short, all of us need to be UAS recruiters—placing recruitment and retention at the forefront of our work. Students tell us that one of the most valued aspects of coming to UAS is a close connection with talented faculty and staff. They tell us that personal interaction is one of the most important factors in deciding to attend our university. Marketing UAS in the media, including social media, is important. But students say that it is the personal engagement with faculty and staff and ‘word of mouth’ recommendations that really make the difference.

Retaining students who are already here is equally important. While we know that some students will eventually transfer, most will stay if they feel a part of an inviting community where they are challenged academically, find a supportive environment, and know that they can complete their degree in a timely way. Effective retention means knowing our students well—helping those who are struggling, who are challenged financially, or who are uncertain about staying.

The time to reverse enrollment declines is now. Prospective students are just now making decisions for next year. We’ve identified enrollment and retention as a major priority—through strategic marketing and enrollment management. A group of UAS faculty, staff, and administrators met recently with representatives from Strategies 360, a Seattle-based firm, to review current marketing efforts and to develop new strategies. This may well include our committing additional one-time funding to marketing and recruitment. You’ll be hearing more about these strategies soon.

A challenging factor is that the number of Alaska high school graduates is projected to decline in coming years—part of a statewide demographic change. This population is key to enrollments in Juneau. We need to re-double our efforts to reach these students, emphasizing what UAS provides: quality education at an affordable price, engagement with talented faculty, small class sizes and a supportive atmosphere, meaningful educational opportunities, and a beautiful place to live. We need to connect with high school counselors and teachers who influence decisions of prospective students—including recipients of Alaska Performance Scholarships (APS). And we need to encourage more transfer students from places like the Pacific Northwest where high school graduate numbers continue to grow. At the same time, we need to continue our successes in recruiting non-traditional students, both for our campus-based programs and for those online.

I invite your ideas and your engagement in improving recruitment and retention here at UAS. We’re all UAS recruiters! We know the great opportunities available at UAS. Let’s share that knowledge widely and see our enrollments and student retention increase.

Thanks for your help!

Snowball Recess in Anchorage

Chancellor Rick Caulfield and Student Senate President Callie Conerton take a break during a recent snowy Board of Regents meeting in Anchorage

Chancellor Rick Caulfield and Student Senate President Callie Conerton take a break during a recent snowy Board of Regents meeting in Anchorage

Investing in Alaska’s Future through the University of Alaska

As the University of Alaska (UA) Board of Regents prepares to consider a FY 2017 proposed budget, I’m reminded of Winston Churchill, who when asked about cutting arts funding in favor of the war effort, replied, “Then what are we fighting for?”

Jim Johnsen, UA President

Since returning to the University in August, after an absence of seven years, I’ve had the opportunity to hear firsthand the stories of success and impact that are a daily occurrence at UA.  Graduation rates are at an all-time high, our students continue to distinguish themselves nationally and internationally, and we have seen a big increase in high demand job area degrees and certificates.  Our faculty are doing groundbreaking research in the Arctic as well as research that helps Alaska’s industries and communities to become more resilient in the face of real challenges facing Alaska right now: climate change, high energy costs, and daunting health and social problems. We are doing all of this even as the face of our university is changing and as we work to reflect and represent our unique locations and cultures all across the state.

This is what I’m fighting for when I present a FY 2017 budget that reflects a 7.6% increase over the current year’s budget.  UA’s accomplishments have been made possible because of investments made by the state and federal governments to support operations, programs, and research; by private companies, foundations, and individuals, including growing numbers of alumni, whose philanthropy enables a margin of excellence; and by our students and their families who demonstrate their belief in what we do through their tuition dollars.

I am sure there are those who believe we are out of touch with Alaska’s current fiscal reality in suggesting an increase that amounts to $26.7 million.  We do so because we believe our budget should be based upon our contractual commitments and on our obligation to ensure we meet our mission of teaching, research and public service on behalf of Alaska and Alaskans. 

After carefully managing two consecutive years of state budget reductions with an effective impact of $52.9 million when you include fixed cost increases, we are proposing a budget that is focused on meeting our obligations for such things as faculty and staff pay and benefits, and costs associated with utilities, facilities maintenance and repair, new facility operating costs, and unfunded federal mandates.  We have included a small request that enhances our ability to serve high priority state research and workforce needs more cost effectively.

On the capital side, we are asking for funds to complete the much-needed UA Fairbanks engineering building and to deal with deferred and current maintenance needs.  In making these requests, our goal is to be prudent stewards of the valuable resources invested in us.

If anyone thinks we are burying our heads in the sand, rest assured that in addition to pressing for what we need, we will spend the next several months building a contingency budget, based upon input from the governor’s office that we might expect a $15.8 million reduction which, when combined with fixed cost increases, will mean a $40.6 million impact. 

We will seek input from Alaska’s public, K-12, corporate, and business leaders, as well as from the university community, to develop scenarios that focus on the state’s highest priorities for the University of Alaska in the coming years.  Our goal in building this alternative budget is to ensure we continue to have those stories of success.  Our students and their future opportunities in Alaska are the “what” we will continue to fight for. 

Detailed information on UA’s budget proposal is available at http://www.alaska.edu/swbir/budget/budget_planning/

As it becomes available, information on UA’s contingency budget and process will also be available at this site.

UAS PR and Marketing Corner

What if You Found Yourself Here?


The University of Alaska Southeast office of PR and Marketing oversees and conducts public and media relations, marketing and outreach, as well as internal communication for the three-campus institution as a whole. The office is responsible for the creation, execution and placement of print products such as ads and brochures, the staff and faculty newsletter and broadcast media including web videos, television and radio ads. In addition, we oversee website content and design as well as social media. Ketchikan and Sitka campuses engage in similar efforts specific to their campuses.

The current video marketing campaign consists of a trio of videos now placed on Youtube, Facebook, Instagram and statewide broadcast media outlets. Entitled, What if you Found Yourself Here? the videos highlight natural sciences programs on the Juneau Icefield,  at Salmon Creek Dam and in the Tongass National Forest.

Take a Look! What if you Found Yourself Here?

Arts and Sciences News

Faculty publications and presentations

Environmental Science faculty Jason Amundson presented, "A heuristic mass-flux calving parameterization" at the West Antarctic Ice Sheet Workshop in Loveland, CO in September. Amundson presented "Seasonality of glacier dynamics and terminus advance at Taku Glacier, Alaska" at the Northwest Glaciologists Meeting in Portland, OR in October.

Amundson also recently co-authored a paper in Geophysical Research Letters titled "Subglacial discharge at tidewater glaciers revealed by seismic tremor.”  Former UAS Geography student Jamie Bradshaw assisted with data collection for this project.  The paper was selected as an Editor's Highlight and is summarized here: https://eos.org/research-spotlights/seismic-signals-reveal-changes-in-water-release-from-glaciers.

Psychology faculty Amanda Sesko presented the paper (In)visibility of Black women: Drawing attention to individuality authored with Monica Biernat of the University of Kansas at the 2015 conference of the Society of Experimental Social Psychology in Denver, CO in September.  The presentation was part of the “Exploring Gendered Race from Cognition to Consequences” symposium session chaired by Erika Hall of Emory University. Sesko travelled to the University of Kansas last month to give an invited talk titled: “The consequences of historical representations for stereotyping and perceived behavioral attributes of Alaska Native people.”

English faculty Ernestine Hayes contributed a chapter titled "The Far North: Literatures of Alaska and Canada" to the recently published Cambridge volume,  A History of Western America.  The publication is edited by Susan Kollin of Montana State University and includes a chapter contributed by former faculty member Sarah Jaquette Ray.

Ketchikan Biology faculty Christopher Donar and UAF Marine Advisory faculty Gary Freitag will give a Friday Night Insight presentation at the U.S. Forest Service Southeast Alaska Discovery Center November 6.  The talk is titled “Invasive Species Research in S.E. Alaska” and kicks off the 2015-2016 lecture series.

Grand Check

First National Bank Alaska demonstrated its commitment to the future of Alaska and to the Southeast region at its ribbon cutting ceremony for the new Juneau Regional Branch Oct. 2.

First National Bank Alaska demonstrated its commitment to the future of Alaska and to the Southeast region at its ribbon cutting ceremony for the new Juneau Regional Branch Oct. 2.

First National Bank Alaska demonstrated its commitment to the future of Alaska and to the Southeast region at its ribbon cutting ceremony for the new Juneau Regional Branch Oct. 2. At the ceremony, Regional Vice President Luke Fanning and Senior Vice President Charlie Weimer presented $15,000 to Chancellor Rick Caulfield and Vice Chancellor Joe Nelson for the "Getting Ready for College" program.

Sitka and Ketchikan Receive Title III Funding

The UAS Ketchikan and Sitka campuses recently received Title III funding from the US Department of Education for Alaska Native and Native Hawaiian Serving Institutions.

The Ketchikan campus has been awarded a $5 million 5‐Year Grant. The purpose of the grant is to increase UASK’s institutional capacity to deliver e-Learning degree programs to Alaska Native and rural Alaskan students.  Major components include:

•   Hiring of an Assistant Professor of Government and Sociology to teach in both disciplines and offer faculty advising and social science tutoring.
•   Hiring two Arts & Sciences eLearning Outreach Advisors to provide initial/orientation advising, career services advising, and internship/community service placement for remote rural and Alaska Native students; and travel for face-to-face advising outreach in students’ home communities, increasing relationships with students, community organizations, and potential employers for UAS students.
•   Contracting with web developers to create an online community site for eLearning students to create a sense of belonging to the UAS eLearning community, build cohorts of student peer networks, and identification with the degree program for remote rural and Alaska Native students.
•   Purchasing and loaning educational technology required for student success to rural and Alaska Native eLearning students for the duration of the project.

The Sitka campus was awarded $3.76 million in Title III funding for the project, The Complete to Compete: A Holistic Approach to Student Success for Alaska Native and High-Need Students. The project will focus on furthering efforts toward integrating student affairs and academic affairs in supporting students and faculty.

Fish Tech e-Learning Students in the Field in Anchorage

Fish Tech faculty Jim Seeland met up with students in Anchorage for a three-day hands-on orientation with Alaska’s fisheries in October.

Fish Tech faculty Jim Seeland met up with students in Anchorage for a three-day hands-on orientation with Alaska’s fisheries in October.

Fish Tech faculty Jim Seeland met up with students in Anchorage for a three-day hands-on orientation with Alaska’s fisheries in October. The Alaska Salmon Culture Lab gave e-Learning students the chance to interact with their professor, hatchery staff, and fish. The course has had great success in Sitka, but this is the first year the lab has been offered in an alternative location. Seeland understands that many of his students have families and full time jobs. “We’re always thinking about how to make our courses more affordable and accessible to students,” he said.

The Anchorage-based course exposed students to a highly advanced fisheries operation. Built in 2011, the William Jack Hernandez hatchery performs all the typical fish culture functions, but is comparatively cutting edge. Students were exposed to the nuts and bolts of fish culture, and got a picture of what the industry will look like in the future. The program ran seamlessly, thanks to the experience and dedication of the state Fish and Game team at the hatchery.  “It was a blast the entire time,” recalls e-Learning FishTech student Iris Fletcher. Fletcher felt like the lab complemented the lectures well, and exposed aspects of working in the industry that could not be learned in a classroom. Students gained experience in the theory behind fish culture, maintenance of facilities, feeding systems, sampling procedures, and water quality monitoring. “I learned a lot,” said Seeland. “It’s more than what I can teach through a screen.”

Presentations

A Wolf Called Romeo

Thank you to author and photographer Nick Jans for a truly extraordinary and heartfelt Evening at Egan presentation at the Egan Library, October 16, 2015

Thank you to author and photographer Nick Jans for a truly extraordinary and heartfelt Evening at Egan presentation at the Egan Library, October 16, 2015

Assimilation at Evening at Egan

The white boys are read the rules by their Yupik teacher in this play that turns the tables on the disturbing history of boarding schools for Alaska Natives.

The white boys are read the rules by their Yupik teacher in this play that turns the tables on the disturbing history of boarding schools for Alaska Natives.

The UAS Juneau campus was the first stop for a statewide tour of the play, Assimilation.  Five actors and Alaska Native playwright and storyteller Jack Dalton took the stage with the two hour play Friday, October 9 at the Egan Library. The performance was followed by a lengthy and informative discussion. The ensemble is touring the play around Alaska with hopes of healing brutal history.

Set in a dystopian future, Assimilation flips the script on the boarding school history that plagues indigenous people around the world. In Assimilation, the Natives are running the boarding school and the Whites are being assimilated into Native culture. The play premiered at Cyrano’s Theatre Company in Anchorage in 2010, and again at Out North Contemporary Art House in 2013 to sold-out performances and critical acclaim. Then Anchorage Daily News Arts Editor Mike Dunham called it “One of the most powerful pieces of locally written theater ever produced here.”

Alaska Natives who survived abuse at boarding schools have praised the play for telling the story of what happened to them without reopening the wounds. “This is a history the entire state must address,” said playwright Jack Dalton. “Whether your family has been in Alaska for generations, or you moved here last week, this history affects us all, and we must all come to terms with it.”

Other confirmed dates and venues include October 13 at the Elders & Youth Conference; Denaina Center Anchorage, Hilton Anchorage Hotel, October 14-18, during AFN; the North Slope Healthy Living Summit, Barrow, October 21-23; UAF, Fairbanks, November 20-21 and Bunnell Street Art Center, Homer, November 27-28.

Publications

Yellow Cedar Research focus of national articles

Assistant Professor of Forest Ecology Brian Buma recently published an article and had an article published about his research on the effects of climate change on yellow cedar trees.

The articles discuss the unique natural history of the Alaskan yellow cedar, a tree species facing massive mortality as a result of climate warming in Southeast Alaska. While it is dying across hundreds of thousands of hectares, it is also expanding slowly around Juneau. Buma’s work is funded in part by an EPSCoR (Experimental Program to Stimulate competitive Research) grant from the National Science Foundation. Buma also works with the Alaska Coastal Rainforest Center on various projects and proposals including one in the town of Kake, Alaska, looking at how small mill operators utilize dead yellow cedar, the economic implications, and the impacts on the environment.

The articles focus on forest dynamics in change in Alaska, at both the local and regional scales using satellite imagery and GIS.  The purpose is to understand how climate change and people are forcing the forest to evolve and change. The two pieces discuss the unique attributes of yellow cedar as well as ongoing efforts to determine the best course of action to help the species.

The articles are: John Krapek and Brian Buma 2015. “Yellow-cedar: climate change and natural history at odds.” Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment 13: 280–281.

“Is this climate change-battered conifer migrating northward?” High Country News

Training

UAS Student Delegation Attends Annual State-wide SHRM Conference

In September, students enrolled in BBA and MPA programs attended the annual statewide meeting for the Society for Human Resources Management in Anchorage.

In September, students enrolled in BBA and MPA programs attended the annual statewide meeting for the Society for Human Resources Management in Anchorage.

In September, students enrolled in BBA and MPA programs attended the annual statewide meeting for the Society for Human Resources Management in Anchorage. They were accompanied by Dr. Charla Brown, Assistant Professor of Management and Faculty Advisor for Human Resource Management.  Dr. Brown was also a conference speaker and shared insights regarding emotional intelligence and change management in separate sessions. Additionally, the UAS delegation was officially recognized by SHRM's visiting national representative. Travel awards were provided by a generous student outreach grant from Northrim Bank.

Transitions

New Ketchikan Sociology Faculty

Congrats Kasia!

Congratulations to Kasia Polanska, who has accepted the new Term Assistant Professor of Sociology position for the remainder of the academic year at the Ketchikan campus. A full search for a 4-year term faculty position is underway. 

 
 

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