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Soundings

Announcements

Faculty Excellence Awards - Now Accepting Nominations

UAS Faculty Senate President Maren Haavig and Interim Provost Priscilla Schulte invite nominations for this year’s UAS Faculty Excellence Awards.

UAS Faculty Senate President Maren Haavig and Interim Provost Priscilla Schulte invite nominations for this year’s UAS Faculty Excellence Awards. Awards are considered in the following categories: Teaching, Research, Service, Adjunct Instruction, Faculty Advising. The deadline for nominations is Friday, April 1, 2016 at 5 p.m.

All fulltime UAS faculty (tenured, tenure-track, or term) are eligible for the teaching, research, service, and advising awards. The adjunct instruction award is for those who have taught as an adjunct during the 2015-16 academic year.

The purpose of these awards is to recognize outstanding faculty and to highlight exceptional accomplishments and practices over the past year. Recipients will each receive an award of $1,000. Awards will be presented at a special Celebration of Faculty Excellence that will take place on Monday, May 2, 2016.

Nominations for these awards may be submitted by faculty, students, staff, research colleagues, or community members from the Provost Office website. Please submit nominations using the on-line application form.

IT SERVICES Ch-ch-ch-changes!

2016 IT Staff Temporary Reorganization

After working for 16 years for UAS IT Services, our Academic Technology Manager, Diana Collins, has retired. As UA is subject to a hiring freeze, ITS has temporarily reorganized to continue to provide quality support to the campus. Donovan Grimes has been appointed temporary supervisor to the IT Helpdesk.  Donovan will temporarily report to Ivan Hazelton and Gloria Merry will report to Mona Yarnall.

Awards

Juneau Spatial History Project Award

Mapping project to be student designed.

Assistant Professor of Humanities Richard Simpson has been awarded Academic Innovation Funding to develop the Juneau Spatial History Project with his Senior Geography Seminar students. This project is directly inspired by the UAS mission statement: student learning enhanced by faculty scholarship, undergraduate research and creative activities, community engagement, and the cultures and environment of Southeast Alaska. Utilizing a variety of data sources and techniques, the students will design and construct an interactive mapping project website that will provide a spatialization of Juneau’s growth as an industrial capital at the turn of the twentieth century.

Events

Cirque to Juneau: A Literary Reading

Associate Professor of English Emily Wall, M.F.A will be reading along with 10 other writers on Tuesday, March 1 at 6:30 p.m. at the Hanger Ballroom.

Associate Professor of English Emily Wall, M.F.A will be reading along with 10 other writers on Tuesday, March 1 at 6:30 p.m. at the Hanger Ballroom. This free event is hosted by Cirque: A Literary Journal for Alaska and the Pacific Northwest.

The Flying University Documentary Premiere and Forum

The premiere of a 360 North documentary that takes viewers inside a literature and philosophy class at Juneau's Lemon Creek Correctional Center led by UAS Professor Sol Neely.

The premiere of a 360 North documentary that takes viewers inside a literature and philosophy class at Juneau's Lemon Creek Correctional Center led by UAS Professor Sol Neely.

“The Flying University”,  a new 360 North documentary,  premiered February 18 at the @360 Studio in Juneau. The short film takes viewers inside a literature and philosophy class at Juneau’s Lemon Creek Correctional Center led by UAS English and Philosophy faculty Sol Neely.

Interviews with inmates, former inmates, students, prison staff, Department of Corrections staff and Neely explore the importance of education in prison, recidivism, reentry, justice reform, and the need for community involvement.

The premiere was followed by a panel discussion with people from the documentary and experts in the field, and addressed questions about the current state of the justice system and how it can be improved. Former inmates who are now UAS students praised Juneau faculty including Glenn Wright, Robin Walz, Dan Monteith, Emily Wall and Rosemarie Alexander. The forum was moderated by documentary producer Scott Burton and will broadcast on 360 North public television on March 11, 2016.

Taku: The Juneau Icefield's Only Advancing Glacier

Amundson and Truffer give Fireside Lecture on the Taku Glacier, March 11.

University of Alaska professors Jason Amundson and Martin Truffer will give a presentation on Friday, March 11, at 6:30 p.m. and 8:30 p.m. to explain how glacial dynamics are pushing up large amounts of sediment in front of advancing Taku Glacier. This is part of the 2016 Fireside Lecture Series at the Mendenhall Glacier Visitor Center.

Making a Splash: Humpbacks and Dolphins

Pearson gives a Fireside Lecture at Mendenhall Glacier Visitor Center Friday, February 12

Making a Splash: Humpbacks and Dolphins

Juneau's waters are home to increasing numbers of humpback whales in addition to dolphins and porpoises. Biologist Heid Pearson studies marine mammal behavior to understand why they are successful here and other regions of the Pacific. 

Friday, February 12 6:30 p.m. and 8:00 p.m. at the Mendenhall Glacier Vistor Center

Learn more about the 2016 Fireside Lectures.

Hires

UAS Names New Provost

Dr. Karen Carey will begin work as the University of Alaska Southeast Provost in Juneau, effective July 1, 2016.

Dr. Karen Carey will begin work as the University of Alaska Southeast Provost in Juneau, effective July 1, 2016.

Dr. Carey currently serves as Dean of Arts and Sciences at California State University Channel Islands, in Ventura, CA. In that position she is responsible for strategic planning and student learning as well as managing academic programs with more than 200 faculty. Dr. Carey holds a Ph.D. in Psychology from the University of Cincinnati. She previously worked at California State University Fresno and in public education. The decision to offer the position to Dr. Carey is consistent with the recommendation of a search committee, chaired by Professor of Biology and Natural Sciences Department Chair David Tallmon. “I am delighted to be joining the University of Alaska Southeast,” said Dr. Carey. “The excellent academic programs, faculty, and staff drew me to apply for the position.  Helping to grow opportunities available to Alaskan students is very exciting.”  Interim Provost Dr. Priscilla Schulte will continue in her role through June 30, 2016, after which she will return to her fulltime responsibilities as UAS Ketchikan Campus Director. “I appreciate the extraordinary dedication Dr. Schulte has shown in serving as Interim Provost,” said Chancellor Rick Caulfield. “We look forward to welcoming Dr. Carey to our university and to the proven leadership she will provide.”

News

Proposed Cuts: UA and Chancellor Urge Input

The University of Alaska and UAS administration encourage input on proposed budget cuts to the legislature, but on your own time and from your personal email address.

The Alaska legislature is considering unprecedented cuts in the state operating budget for FY17. Both the House and the Senate are working fast on the budget and other legislation affecting the UA community. The best way to stay up to date on the latest news, upcoming opportunities to testify to legislative committees and other opportunities for advocacy is to subscribe to the SupportUA Listserve to receive the Capitol Report and other important updates on the university’s budget and other legislative matters.

There have been some questions about advocating for university funding using university equipment or time. UA suggests that when contacting legislators regarding issues such as the budget you avoid using university email or other resources, and that you do so on your own time, such as lunch time or after work. The university's budget is not a partisan political issue or a ballot measure -- those issues are subject to very strict prohibitions or restrictions on use of state resources. However, your advocacy will have the greatest effect if it does not raise use of resource issues.

A great source of up-to-date information on legislative budget action and hearings is the Capitol Report posted on the State Relations webpage. It contains important, time-sensitive information, opportunities for public testimony and legislative contacts. Your support is critical. Please read it at: http://www.alaska.edu/state/report/

Beyond the budget, the University of Alaska Southeast’s future will be shaped by UA Strategic Pathways—President Johnsen’s proposal for a leaner and more streamlined university system. The President has just released a Strategic Pathways draft document that includes proposed focus areas for UAS. A copy of the draft can be found on the UA Statewide website.

Chancellor Rick Caulfield strongly encourages staff, faculty and students to review the Strategic Pathways document as it relates to UAS.  Strategic Pathways will evolve over the next several months, and your feedback and input on the proposed focus areas for UAS will be a critical component of the overall effort.  Email President Johnsen and the Board of Regents to let them know of your support for a vibrant university in Southeast Alaska. You can do so at ua-pathways@alaska.edu.

Let the President and Board know how UAS has helped you fulfill your educational goals. Your voice is important!

Staff, Faculty and Students Testify on Guns on Campus Bill

UAS staff, students and faculty testified against a bill that would allow concealed firearms to be carried on UA campuses at a February 18 hearing of the Senate Education committee.

Juneau campus Student Senate president Callie Conerton, Sociology faculty Lora Vess and Web Coordinator Colin Osterhout expressed concern that Senate Bill 174 would make UA campuses less and not more safe. The University of Alaska opposes the bill, saying it, “significantly impacts UA’s ability to manage firearm risk proactively.”

Assistant Professor of Sociology Lora Vess testified, “My concern is that the legislative response with this bill is not reflective of any systematic understanding of the roots of violence on university campuses.  Instead, I am concerned that this bill is ideologically driven with a narrow conceptualization of freedom and liberty that has nothing to do the operations and needs of Alaska’s universities, or of the safety of the thousands of students, faculty, staff, visitors, and minors who are on Alaskan campuses on any given day.”

Student Senate President Callie Conerton expressed concern that Alaska has no required concealed carry permit. “There is no guarantee that said person knows how to safety operate a firearm, is in the right state of mind, or has not had charges filed against them in the past,” said Conerton in her testimony. “This doesn’t even begin to touch on the fact that students would be able to have firearms in the dorms where their roommates or visitors would have easy access to a weapon and could operate the firearm when under the influence.”

In a letter to SB 174 sponsor Pete Kelly, Juneau campus based web coordinator Colin Osterhout wrote, “I view this bill as an unnecessary attempt to hastily enforce partisan beliefs upon the University of Alaska without sufficient research, deliberation, or public input from all stakeholders.”

Presentations

Dr. Robin Walz Guest Lecture at Young Harris College

Professor of History Dr. Robin Walz to Deliver Lecture at Young Harris College

Professor of History Robin Walz, Ph.D., will deliver a lecture titled “Crime on the Black Market: French Detective Fiction under the Nazi Occupation" on Monday, Feb. 29, at 7 p.m. in the Hatcher Dining Room of the Rollins Campus Center on the Young Harris College in Young Harris, GA. 

The lecture stems from Dr. Walz’s special fondness for the St. Cyr/Kohler crime series by Canadian author J. Robert Janes, which is set during the Nazi Occupation of France. He often writes scholarly essays on French criminals, detectives, and avengers, most recently on the criminal-turned-avenger Rocambole for The Re-Enchantment of the World: Secular Magic in a Rational Age (Stanford University Press, 2009). 

Dr. Walz’s research specializes in the history of popular culture in modern France. In 2000, the University of California Press published his article titled “Pulp Surrealism: Insolent Popular Culture in Early Twentieth-Century Paris,” and he translated Philippe Soupault’s surrealist crime story parody called “Death of Nick Carter,” from French into English for the literary review McSweeney’s Quarterly Concern, issue 24

Bachelder Presents at the ASSEC Conference

Dr. Heather Batchelder attended the 2016 Alaska Statewide Special Education Conference (ASSEC) where she presented at the session entitled IEP Goals: From Paper to Classrooms to Families.

Dr. Heather Batchelder attended the 2016 Alaska Statewide Special Education Conference (ASSEC) where she presented at the session entitled IEP Goals: From Paper to Classrooms to Families.

The Alaska Statewide Special Education Conference (ASSEC) was held last week from February 2nd through 10, 2016 sponsored by The Council for Exceptional Children in Alaska. This conference is a great opportunity for special educators to learn and share in a collaborative environment. Many UAS graduates are here as their district sends them to the conference. Dr. Batchelder was able to visit with a few UAS graduates to include Laura Steward. Ms. Steward is our very first  UAS graduate of our fairly new Bachelors in Special Education. Like Laura, many of those in attendance are first or second year teachers. Dr. Batchelder sits on the CEC board along with professors in special education from UAA and UAF. 

UAS School of Education Assistant Professor Heather L. Batchelder presented at the session entitled IEP Goals: From Paper to Classrooms to Families. Participants learned to take their students' IEP goals from the paperwork and embed learning opportunities throughout the day plus how to take and track data on the students' progress towards their goals. They also learned that communicating progress towards the IEP goals and how the children "look" when they are actively engaged in learning opportunities is important to families of the community because families may want to extend their child's opportunites to learn in the domestic setting.   Batchelder also reported that the CEC held their teacher of the year luncheon and the Governor's Council for Disabilities Inclusive Practice as part of the conference. 

 
 

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