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Power and Privilege Symposium

2020 UAS Power & Privilege Symposium

Tuesday, November 9, 2020 8:15 a.m.–7 p.m. at the UAS Juneau Campus

Power and Privilege Symposium Logo

Portions will be streamed live over the internet.

The Symposium is scheduled as a regular part of the university’s fall calendar; most classes do not meet on the scheduled day to allow broad participation by students, faculty, staff, and community members.

About the UAS Power and Privilege Symposium

The 5th Annual UAS Power & Privilege Symposium is a one day conference-style event designed to give members of the UAS & Southeast Alaska communities an opportunity to explore dynamic and pressing societal changes through difficult, thoughtful, and honest conversations about the complex and increasingly diverse society in which we live.

The Symposium helps advance the University’s role in pursuing truth, advancement of learning, and the dissemination of knowledge in a setting supportive of free inquiry and discussion. Topics in recent symposia include ways social hierarchies and identities manifest themselves in our communities and discussions about the intersection of race, ethnicity, gender, sexuality, age, religion, body size, ability, mental illness, and class.

Topics for the Symposium may be proposed by any member of the UAS community and are selected with a goal of sharing diverse perspectives and experiences. The one-day Symposium is scheduled as a regular part of the University’s fall calendar; most classes do not meet on the scheduled day to allow broad participation by students, faculty, staff, and community members.

While the Symposium will be held on the UAS Juneau campus, keynote speeches and a selection of breakout sessions will be available live via distance.

2019 Session Details

See below for the 2019 schedule and session details. Details for the 2020 Symposium will become available as we get closer to the event date.

Date / TimeEventLocation
8:15–8:30 a.m.Continental BreakfastSpike's Cafe
8:30–8:45 a.m.Aak’w Kwaan WelcomeEgan Library
8:45–9:00 a.m.Event WelcomeEgan Library
9:00–9:50 a.m.Opening KeynoteEgan Library
9:50 a.m.-5:00 p.m.Pop-up Art Galleries Open1st Floor Egan Classrooms
10:00–10:50 a.m.Breakout Session 12nd Floor Egan Building Classrooms
11:00–11:50 a.m.Breakout Session 22nd Floor Egan Building Classrooms
12:00–12:50 p.m.Lunch (Catered)Lakeside Grill
1:00–1:50 p.m.Afternoon KeynoteEgan Library
2:00-4:40 p.m.Expo Open1st Floor Egan Hallway
2:00–2:50 p.m.Breakout Session 32nd Floor Egan Building Classrooms
3:00–3:50 p.m.Breakout Session 42nd Floor Egan Building Classrooms
4:00–4:50 p.m.Breakout Session 52nd Floor Egan Building Classrooms
5:00–6:00 p.m.Banquet (Catered)Lakeside Grill

2019 Keynote Speakers

Forest Wagner

Forest Wagner’s session will focus on “Climate Despair and a Psychology of Hope.”
Forest is an Assistant Professor of Outdoor Studies at UAS where he teaches environmental humanities classes in outdoor leadership and skills. A winter person and snow enthusiast (skier), his current research interests center on climate disorientation – how a world with less winter will affect the psyche of a lover of snow. A native of Fairbanks, Forest works in the summer as a salmon fisherman in Bristol Bay. He earned his Master of Arts degree in Arctic and Northern Studies from the University of Alaska Fairbanks. Forest has been coordinating and teaching in the Outdoor Studies Program since 2006.

Heather Kendall-Miller

Heather will share experiences from her prolific career in fighting for Alaska Native rights. A well-respected and award-winning Athabascan lawyer, teacher, and mentor, Heather’s legal experience includes cases involving subsistence, tribal sovereignty, human rights, language and cultural preservation. In 1998, she was the first Alaska Native to argue a case before the U.S. Supreme Court, fighting on behalf of the Native Village of Venetie. Born in Seward and raised in Fairbanks, she holds a Bachelor of Arts in History from the University of Alaska Fairbanks, and in 1991 became the first Alaska Native to graduate from Harvard Law School.  After more than 25 years at the Native American Rights Fund, Heather is now officially semi-retired, but continues to champion the important and culturally significant Katie John subsistence case, to ensure that it’s holding is not undermined by the more recent sport hunting decision, Sturgeon v. Frost., as it continues to wend its way through the federal court system to this day. Complete biographical information on Heather can be found at uas.alaska.edu/pub/HKM.

2019 Breakout Sessions

View the full session descriptions

9:00 a.m. Keynote Speaker Forest Wagner

Climate of Despair and a Psychology of Hope

Forest Wagner, UAS Assistant Professor of Outdoor Studies (Egan Library & Streaming)

10:00 a.m. Breakout Sessions

Unpacking Privilege in the Zero Waste Movement

CJ Harrell, UAS Undergraduate Student & Lora Vess Associate Professor of Sociology; Department Chair, Social Science (Egan Lecture Hall & Streaming)

“Roots of Anger”: Why the Yellow Vests Matter

Robin Walz, Professor of History (Egan 221)

Decolonization and the Hostile Occupation of Alaska

Phillip Moser, Keep Walking with Cody Campaign & Samantha Eyre-Harrison, Juneau Community Member (Egan 218)

Outdoor Leadership as a Service

Forest Wagner, Assistant Professor of Outdoor Studies (Egan 219)

Digital Accessibility: Start Here

Colin Osterhout: Website coordinator, Kaia Henrickson: Information Literacy Librarian and Liaison to the Center for Excellence in Learning and Teaching & Jenny Malecha: Disability Services Specialist (Egan 223)

11:00 a.m. Breakout Sessions

Gender, Sexuality & Inclusion

Andria Budbill, Planned Parenthood Community Outreach Educator & Teen Council Facilitator (Egan Lecture Hall & Streaming)

Alaska’s Nuclear Legacy: A Case Study on Environmental Racism

Shelby Surdyk, Project Coordinator for Point Hope: Alaska’s Youth Congress for the Global Elimination of Nuclear Weapons, Anastasia Pleasant, UAS Undergraduate Student, Eric Bookless, Beyond the Bomb, Anastasia Tarmann, Alaska State Library & Archives (Egan 221)

Indigenous Youth Healing the Past, Present, and Future. “What Does Intergenerational Healing Look Like?”

Justice Elizah Dominy, UAS Undergraduate Student & Kolene James, Student Equity and Multicultural Services Manager (Egan 218)

Information Privilege, Power and Paywalls: The Business of Scholarship

Jonas Lamb, Associate Professor of Library Science (Egan 219)

Sustainability Walking Tour

UAS Sustainability Committee (starts in Egan 223)

12:00 p.m. Lunch Provided, Mourant Cafeteria

1:00 p.m. Keynote Speaker Heather Kendall-Miller

Fighting for Alaskan Native Rights

Heather Kendall-Miller, Attorney and Champion of Native American Civil Rights (Egan Library & Streaming)

2:00 p.m. Breakout Sessions

How to be a “Green Dot,” Bystander Intervention

UAS Undergraduate Students: Delaney Pfender and Cameron Manahan, and Nathan Bodenstadt, Director of Housing and Residence Life (Egan Lecture Hall & Streaming)

The Juliana Plaintiffs: Models for Youth in Politics

UAS Undergraduate Students and Sustainability Club members: Olive Brend, Rayne Billings, Calvin Zuelow, Lillian Bannerman (tentative) & Lora Vess Associate Professor of Sociology; Department Chair, Social Science (Egan 221)

The Spirit of Money

UAS Undergraduate Student Sage Logan and Kolene James, Student Equity and Multicultural Services Manager (Egan 218)

Architecture of Power: Past and Present

UAS Undergraduate Student Danny MacDonald & Erica Hill, Professor of Anthropology ((Egan 219)

Family Art Making: Using Art to Promote Communication

Carrie Kline, Art Therapist and Financial Aid Advisor at UAS & Dorolyn Alper, Behavioral Health Consultant and Registered Nurse with SEARHC (Egan 223)

3:00 p.m. Breakout Sessions

Working with Men: Healing and Accountability

Richard Cole, JCAP Facilitator with AWARE (Egan Lecture Hall & Streaming)

Reproductive Health Care Access in Alaska

UAS Undergraduate Students and Generation Action Club Members: Calvin Zuelow, Olive Brend, Lillian Bannerman, and Kolene James, Student Equity and Multicultural Services Manager (Egan 221)

Freedom of Speech: Reality vs. Myth

Haifa Sadighi, Juneau Human Rights Commission, Michelle Burlin, JHRCommission Member, Ric Iannolino, Community Advocacy, Ibn Bailey, JHRCommission Member & Rosemarie Alexander-Isett, Assistant Professor of Communication (Egan 218)

Breaking Down Ableism: a Panel Discussion

Kat Sprengard, Adaptive Recreation Specialist with Southeast Alaska Independent Living (ORCA Program); Emma Van Nes Adaptive Recreation Specialist; Colleen Scott, Youth Program Coordinator (Egan 219)

Event+Response=Outcome/Suicide Prevention

Jan Reece, Outreach and Training Coordinator for Juneau Suicide Prevention Coallition (Egan 223)

4:00 p.m. Breakout Sessions

Toward Indigenous Collections Management at the Alaska State Museum

Andrew Washburn, Museum Registrar of the Alaska State Museum & Andrea Cook, Haida Artist and Scholar (Egan Lecture Hall & Streaming)

Lived Experiences of Alaskan Transgender and Gender Non Bianary Individuals

Panel moderated by Margie Thomson, MSW & LCSW, coordinator of Counseling, Disability Services and Wellness at UAS (Egan 221)

Power, Privilege and the Global War on Terror

Dan Aalbers, Assistant Professor of Arts & Sciences (Egan 218)

Speaking Truth to Privilege, Our Life Stories

Nathan Bodenstadt, Director of Housing and Residence Life (Egan 219)

5:00 p.m. Continuing Conversations Banquet, Mourant Cafeteria

2019 Recorded Sessions

The following sessions were live streamed and recorded at the 2019 event. View them online at the University's Youtube Account.

Watch a Session

Climate of Despair and a Psychology of Hope

9:00 AM - Keynote Speaker Forest Wagner
Forest Wagner, UAS Assistant Professor of Outdoor Studies

Forest Wagner’s session will focus on “Climate Despair and a Psychology of Hope.”
Forest is an Assistant Professor of Outdoor Studies at UAS where he teaches environmental humanities classes in outdoor leadership and skills.  A winter person and snow enthusiast (skier), his current research interests center on climate disorientation –  how a world with less winter will affect the psyche of a lover of snow.  A native of Fairbanks, Forest works in the summer as a salmon fisherman in Bristol Bay. He earned his Master of Arts degree in Arctic and Northern Studies from the University of Alaska Fairbanks. Forest has been coordinating and teaching in the Outdoor Studies Program since 2006.

Unpacking Privilege in the Zero Waste Movement

10:00 to 10:50 a.m.
CJ Harrell, UAS Undergraduate Student & Lora Vess Associate Professor of Sociology; Department Chair, Social Science

The purpose of this session is to examine a zero-waste lifestyle through the lens of privilege, In this presentation, l explain the differences between zero-waste being a habit, lifestyle, and trend, and examine how each requires different levels of income, time, and inherent privilege. I also discuss the ways in which social media has influenced the zero-waste movement and the importance of doing research before investing in eco-friendly products. To demonstrate this I will bring in my own environmentally-friendly products and discuss the levels of privilege that were required to purchase these products. The session includes a Q/A and a discussion where I will answer any questions and discuss other related topics based off of audience interest. This session is to recognise those who do not have the ability to live a zero-waste lifestyle and to educate those who do have that privilege.

Gender, Sexuality & Inclusion

11:00 a.m. to 11:50 a.m.
Andria Budbill, Planned Parenthood Community Outreach Educator & Teen Council Facilitator

Explore basic vocabulary terms on gender and sexuality and some strategies to be more inclusive and respectful toward the LGBTQ2+ people in your life. We will discuss language use, various aspects of sexuality, and effective methods to practice inclusivity and showing respect to people of all sexual identities.

Fighting for Alaskan Native Rights

1:00  PM - Keynote Speaker Heather Kendall-Miller

Heather will share experiences from her prolific career in fighting for Alaska Native rights. A well-respected and award-winning Athabascan lawyer, teacher, and mentor, Heather’s legal experience includes cases involving subsistence, tribal sovereignty, human rights, language and cultural preservation. In 1998, she was the first Alaska Native to argue a case before the U.S. Supreme Court, fighting on behalf of the Native Village of Venetie. Born in Seward and raised in Fairbanks, she holds a Bachelor of Arts in History from the University of Alaska Fairbanks, and in 1991 became the first Alaska Native to graduate from Harvard Law School.  After more than 25 years at the Native American Rights Fund, Heather is now officially semi-retired, but continues to champion the important and culturally significant Katie John subsistence case, to ensure that it’s holding is not undermined by the more recent sport hunting decision, Sturgeon v. Frost., as it continues to wend its way through the federal court system to this day. Complete biographical information on Heather can be found at uas.alaska.edu/pub/HKM.

How to be a “Green Dot,” Bystander Intervention

2:00 to 2:50 p.m.
UAS Undergraduate Students: Delaney Pfender and Cameron Manahan, and Nathan Bodenstadt, Director of Housing and Residence Life

We will talk about the importance of the Green Dot Program. We are going to cover the basics of what Green Dot is and how it will benefit our campus and Juneau. We are going to be offering some training to give people the skills to be more Green Dot active, and the tools that they need to be more aware in hopes of making a safer community. We are hoping to work to get students and community members excited and involved in some training. We are going to also be sharing some resources and more training that we are hoping to offer during next semester, and some that are offered within the community.

Working with Men: Healing and Accountability

3:00 to 3:50 p.m.
Richard Cole, JCAP Facilitator with AWARE

A panel discussion on working with men around preventing violence and dismantling patriarchal ways of thinking. The panel will include men that work at AWARE doing this work in our community. Topics with be patriarchal and colonial influences, intersectionality, unhealthy and limiting ideas on masculinity and maleness.

Toward Indigenous Collections Management at the Alaska State Museum

4:00 to 4:50 p.m.
Andrew Washburn, Museum Registrar of the Alaska State Museum & Andrea Cook, Haida Artist and Scholar

In the summer of 2019, Andrea Cook, Haida artist and scholar, became the first participant in a new program at the Alaska State Museum (ASM): the Indigenous Collections Management Internship. This program is designed to give indigenous students the opportunity to work behind the scenes with Alaska’s collections. The purpose of the program is to help build a new generation of leaders in the management of cultural resources in Alaska—one that can redefine what a museum is, who it serves, and how it operates. Implementation of the internship program was fraught with challenges from all quarters. Ultimately, this program broke ground on a new long-term project that will lead to better preservation of Alaska’s unique cultural resources. Cook, along with her supervisor, ASM registrar Andrew Washburn, will present on the program, their experiences, specific projects accomplished, what the future might hold, and open up to questions and discussion.

Past Events

2018 Event

The Symposium Program for 2018, includes the schedule, keynote speakers, and breakout session details is available for download.

Keynotes and Recorded Sessions

All keynotes as well as select breakout sessions are available for viewing online through the UAS YouTube Channel. See the program for a full description.

Sponsors

We would like to thank our event sponsors of the 2018 event:

  • UAS First Year Experience
  • UAS Student Activities
  • UAS Student Government

2017 Event

The Symmposium Program for 2017, which includes the schedule, keynote speakers, and breakout session details is available for download.

Keynotes and Recorded Sessions

All keynotes as well as select breakout sessions are available for viewing online. See the program (above) for a full descriptions.

Event Welcome and Opening Keynote

Afternoon and Evening Keynotes

Breakout Sessions in the Egan Lecture Hall

Breakout Sessions in the Glacier View Room

Sponsors

We would like to thank our generous event sponsors of the 2017 event:

  • UAS First Year Experience 
  • UAS Student Activities
  • UAS Student Government

2016 Event

The program, which includes the schedule, keynote speakers, and breakout session details, is available for download.

Keynotes and Recorded Sessions

All keynotes as well as select breakout sessions are available for viewing online. A list of available videos:

  • Áakʼw Ḵwáan Welcome with Marie Olson & Liana Wallace 
  • Opening Keynote - Manic Depression in America with Andrew James Archer, MSW, LCSW
  • Session 1 - Stereotyping and its Effects in Evaluative and Performance Domains with Amanda Sesko, Ph.D; Assistant Professor of Psychology, UAS
  • Session 2 - Rape Culture: Hiding in Plain Sight with Mandy O'Neal Cole, Deputy Director, AWARE Afternoon Keynote - Dancing Soverenignty: Reclaiming the Grease Trail Through Movement and Song with Mique'l Dangeli
  • Session 3 - How Anthologies Empower Communities by Weaving Literature with Politics with Martha Amore, Professor, UAA
  • Session 4 - Examining Climate Change through a Lens of Power & Privilege with a panel of UAS faculty, staff, and student representatives
  • Session 5 - The Act of Dreaming: Undocumented Students in the United States with Christina Gómez, Professor of Liberal Arts and Director of Diversity and Inclusion, School of the Art Institute of Chicago
  • Evening Keynote - Gender Transition: A Personal Change for One or a Paradigm Shift for Everyone? with Aidan Key

Sponsors

We would like to thank our generous event sponsors of the 2016 event:

  • UAS First Year Experience 
  • UAS Student Activities
  • UAS Native & Rural Student Center
  • UAS Counseling
  • SEAGLA
  • NAMI

Committee Members

Juliette Alldredge
Committee Chair & Student Activities Coordinator
Brandy Mulbury
Student Government President
Christian English
Student Government Representative
CJ Harrell
Student Government Representative
Tina Ryman
Transitions Advisor/STEPS Program Coordinator
Ele Ruchti
Student Activities Board Representative
Forest Wagner
Assistant Professor of Outdoor Studies
Kolene James
Coordinator, Native and Rural Student Center
Lora Vess
Department Chair, Arts and Sciences - Social Sciences
Lilli Bannerman
Student Government Representative
Margie Thomson
Coordinator for Disability and Counseling Services
Nathan Bodenstadt
Housing and Residence Life Director
Peter Sommers
Associate Registrar
Tatiana Topping
Student Information Specialist
Robin Gilcrist
Associate Professor of Construction Technology
Richard Simpson
Assistant Professor of Humanities
Robin Waltz
Professor of History
Sean McCarthy
First Year Experience Coordinator